Planet F-Droid

October 26, 2020

EteSync

EteSync 2.0 Is Now Released!

EteSync 2.0 Is Now Released!

We are very excited to announce the official release of EteSync 2.0!

This would not have been possible without the hundreds of testers that helped us make sure everything is solid! So thank you all!

If you already know what EteSync 2.0 is and just want to upgrade your account, please refer the EteSync 2.0 migration guide.

As we said in the post announcing EteSync 2.0, time flies. We still can't believe it has already been three and a half years since EteSync was first released. It started out as a simple end-to-end encrypted sync solution for Android. We have since added support for sharing data with other users, and we now have clients for the desktop (DAV bridge), the web, and iOS, built-in support in and Tasks.org, and there are add-ons being built for GNOME, KDE and Thunderbird.

What is EteSync 2.0?

EteSync uses the EteSync protocol (now Etebase protocol) behind the scenes to power all of the apps. While the existing protocol has served us well, it limited our progress and prevented us from achieving some of the things we would like to achieve for EteSync, so after three and a half years, it's finally time for a major protocol upgrade.

EteSync 2.0 is a great improvement over the 1.0 version, while still maintainig everyone's favourite features and capabilities, including, end-to-end encryption, sharing and a full version history. However, since so much has changed under the hood, EteSync 2.0 and 1.0 are incompatible, and you need to migrate your account to 2.0 in order to start using it.

What does it mean for you?

It means we are finally be able to offer some long awaited and often requested features such as notes synchronization and secure location sharing. It means that your sync is faster. It means the EteSync applications are simpler to develop, which means they are easier to improve. We are already seeing these benefits in all of the apps, which already work much better, and helped us reduce large amounts of code.

In addition, there are a lot of user-facing improvements and changes, including:

  1. EteSync 2.0 uses usernames for identification (rather than emails previously), so you will need to choose a new username. Usernames should be at least 6 characters long. Shorter usernames will probably be allowed in the future. Changing your email and username will both be possible later on.
  2. EteSync 2.0 has just one password that's used for both the encryption, and the login. It uses a zero-knowledge proof to authenticate to the server making sure your password never leaves your device. Please make sure to keep it safe and don't lose it, as without it you won't be able to access your data!
  3. The change log (previously change journal) used to show all of the changes in one long list. Changes are now grouped per item with only the latest changed shown. To show previous changes you need to click on an item and check the past revisions.
  4. Invitations UI is a bit different, and there's now a special page for accepting or rejecting invitations, and it's now also easier to leave collections you've been invited to.
  5. "Journal" has now been renamed to "Collection", which is a more accurate term and people find it less confusing.
  6. You can now easily change your account's email address directly from the dashboard.

What's next

The above is just the tip of the iceberg. The biggest benefit of changing to EteSync 2.0 is not how it improves things, but rather what it enables us to do next!

Thanks to EteSync 2.0 we were already able to release EteSync Notes. Additionally, as we said in the previous post, we aren't ready to get into details just yet, but we plan on bringing in some long-awaited features such as secure location sharing. Expect a few more announcements in the coming month or two which will make EteSync a more complete solution for your data syncing needs!

We also plan on formally verifying the protocol using Verifpal and releasing a formal spec to make it easier for other developers to examine, use and improve it, and potentially making it into a standard.

Upgrade to EteSync 2.0

Upgrading to EteSync 2.0 is very easy. First thing to do is to make sure you've update all of your apps to their latest versions.

As we said above, EteSync 2.0 accounts are incompatible with EteSync 1.0 accounts, so a new account needs to be created. However, the billing for both is linked. The migration tool automatically takes care of linking the billing, so you don't need to worry about that.

For step-by-step instructions please refer to the EteSync 2.0 migration guide.

Developers: easily build end-to-end encrypted applications

Over the years many developers have reached out to us about adding end-to-end encryption to their applications. Building end-to-end encrypted applications is both hard to get right, and very time consuming, so using an existing solution makes a lot of sense, especially since EteSync is versatile and isn't limited to contacts, calendars, tasks and notes.

We are now also ready for developers. For more information, please take a look at the developer homepage (Etebase).

Thank you NLnet and NGI0

The work on EteSync 2.0 is made possible with financial support from NLnet Foundation, courtesy of NGI0 Discovery and the European Commission DG CNECT's Next Generation Internet programme.

The NLnet foundation in general and the NGI0-PET in particular is funding projects to protect everyone's digital privacy, especially in the context of the "next generation" of the internet. It's an extremely important cause which we at EteSync are very much aligned with. Please help by spreading the word about them.


As usual, we would like to remind you that we rely on your feedback and contributions to make EteSync better. Do you have any suggestions or  are experiencing any issues? Please send patches, report issues or just contact us.

Come chat with us on IRC/Matrix, or follow us on Mastodon, Twitter, Facebook, reddit or RSS for the latest updates and privacy-related content!

by Tom Hacohen at October 26, 2020 09:41

Tutanota

We are very happy to welcome Valentin, John, Tim and Patrik!

We are excited to let you know that Tutanota is growing more rapidly than ever! In the last two months alone, we have on-boarded four new team members. Please welcome with us John, Tim, Patrik and Valentin.

October 26, 2020 00:00

October 23, 2020

Fairphone

An update from our CEO: Reported software issues and our next steps

A month ago, I was proud to share our latest milestone with all of you – the launch of the Fairphone 3+ and our upgraded modules. Today, we’re reminded that the journey of building an ethical smartphone company is not without its ups and downs. In both cases, I’d like to reach out and personally update everyone, so let’s get straight into it:

Currently, some Fairphone 3 and 3+ owners are experiencing disruptive software-related issues. Our community was quick to flag this to us, both on the forum and to our customer support. So we are aware and working hard to find the root cause. While our investigation is still ongoing, I would like to apologize for the inconvenience and get everyone up to speed on the situation.

Known issues

Although only a small number of customers seem to be affected, we realize that some of these issues impact them significantly. Obviously, making sure that everyone has the best possible Fairphone experience is our top priority. Some of the key problems being reported to us are the following :

– During calls the phone reboots randomly
– Calls not always connecting on the first attempt
– So called “ghost touches”, meaning random, unwanted touch input

Finding the root cause

Reproducing the issues mentioned above is key in finding the root cause and creating a solution. Both of our teams – here in Amsterdam and in Taipei – are on top of it, reviewing the reports and attempting to reproduce the issues. Our biggest challenge is that our engineers in Taiwan can’t yet reproduce some key issues. This points to a possible connection between the reported bugs and European mobile networks.

Working towards a solution

We are ramping up efforts to identify the root cause. As this occurs randomly, our team in Amsterdam is collecting information in order to find a pattern to reproduce the issue. As a first step, we started to log data from our Fairphone colleagues, to track down the origin. We relay this information directly to our team in Taiwan. If it turns out that we need more data in a shorter time span, we will broaden this group to supporters from our community.

If you are experiencing random reboots, when contacting our customer support team, please include the following:

  • Your Network Operator(s)
  • The country where you are experiencing the issue
  • The build number of your phone (settings > about phone > build number)
  • Steps to reproduce the issue. (For example, if it happens after using certain apps, making a call, etc.)
  • Whether or not you are using an SD card
  • The frequency of the issue

In the meantime, each case will be personally reviewed by our customer support team. I sincerely apologize for the inconvenience, but thank you for your patience and understanding. As soon as we have more information, I will update this blogpost.


Deutschsprachige Kunden finden das übersetzte Update hier >>

Clients francophones, veuillez trouver la mise à jour traduite ici >>

The post An update from our CEO: Reported software issues and our next steps appeared first on Fairphone.

by Eva at October 23, 2020 15:34

Tutanota

Email alias: How do email aliases add to my security and how do I use them?

An email alias is an additional email address that you can use for a special purpose. Tutanota lets you add five or more aliases in the Premium and Pro versions, which you can use for receiving and sending secure emails. In this post, we have collected everything you need to know about email aliases, including how to set them up in Tutanota.

October 23, 2020 00:00

October 21, 2020

Purism

A Librem 5 Video Made on a Librem 5

When it comes to making a video, there are a lot of workflows involved. From writing, planning, to local screen capture, all the way to editing raw 4k footage with proxy clips. Even with all that workflow complexity, the following video was made completely on the Librem 5 phone.

Step by Step

While you can use the onboard mic, you can also drive a USB audio interface from a powered USB c hub. This allowed capturing great audio from a condenser mic.

Cleaning up the audio and editing the video works the same on the phone as it does on any Librem hardware running PureOS.

 

Ultimately the Librem 5 phone lets you take your regular workflow with you while also keeping you in contact with your friends and family.

The Librem 5 is a full-blown quad-core desktop computer, that is also a phone.

Discover the Librem 5

Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

Preorder now

The post A Librem 5 Video Made on a Librem 5 appeared first on Purism.

by David Hamner at October 21, 2020 18:43

October 20, 2020

Jolla

Shared mobile devices

The need for device sharing has become increasingly important for our partners. And it’s easy to understand why: imagine a scenario where a mobile device is required for executing certain actions during a business process. Each workstation has a mobile device and when a work shift changes the previous shift logs out of it and the new shift logs in. In this case the mobile device is more of a shared resource than a personal device.

One of the major new features that we’re excited to have included in the latest 3.4 Pallas-Yllästunturi release is the ability to have multiple users on the same device that can be switched between in this way. For regular everyday use of Sailfish OS this doesn’t have any impact, the device owner (the primary user) works just as it used to. However, release 3.4 will have a new ‘defaultuser’ (devices flashed prior to 3.4.0 keep ‘nemo’ user, but it’s only the name that’s different). The new ‘defaultuser’ name is mostly visible behind the scenes for application developers; end users can ignore this detail.

The big change is that unlike previous versions a device can now have six additional users on top of the device owner. These additional users have fewer capabilities. For instance, additional users can’t install new applications to or remove existing applications from the device, nor can they perform a system upgrade. All installed apps that the device owner has installed are visible for additional users, but as the home directory is different for the additional users the actual application data is not shared between different users. As you can see, we are following the standard way of handling users and user data for Unix-like systems. If you are an application developer and have previously stored data outside XDG directories you should start using them now. This has always been a Harbour requirement, and Qt and Silica make it easy with QStandardPaths and StandardPaths [3]. Protecting user data is done by applying discretionary access control (DAC) rules for each user and limiting read and write access from groups and others users. There’s an exception to this when it comes to Android App support. More on this later in the blog.

First let’s discuss a bit about the access rights in more detail. The device owner’s permissions are just as they used to be, but as explained above, the newly created users do have some access limitations, such as the limitations on package installation rights and device upgrades. In addition WLAN access points and VPN connections have changed so that they are user-specific. Each of the users now has their own set of WLAN access points and VPN connections. The mobile data connection is shared between all users. Of course, each user also has their own security code. When a device is booted up and home encryption is enabled all of the users are able to unlock home encryption with their individual unlock code, a requirement since each user’s data is stored under the home directory.

On the Lock Screen the security code is matched against the user that’s currently logging in. This leads to a user switch, during which all running applications for the current user are stopped and new ones started for the next user, similar to if the device had been rebooted. The most convenient way to change the user is via the Top Menu that can be opened by swiping down from the top edge of the screen. When two or more users have been created on the device, the last item on the Top Menu shows the active user. Tapping this opens a list which can be used to switch user. This user-switching option is also available from the Top Menu of the Lock Screen.

Only the device owner (the so-called “primary user”) is allowed to create new users, remove existing users or modify access rights. In terms of access rights, at the moment they can control whether additional users have SMS or phone access rights. When the device owner grants an access right to a feature, the granted permissions are visible for the user to whom the access right was granted upon next device login. In the future we plan to introduce other access control points for the device owner over newly created users. This will complement the evolution of the Mobile device management (MDM) API that we’ve been introducing to Sailfish OS over the last few releases.

We know that many of our users are technically-minded and will be interested in how the architecture evolved during development. Let me try to shed some light on this and get into some of the detail. As mentioned above all access control is achieved using POSIX-standard DAC. When the device owner grants access rights to an additional user for use of the phone or SMS, the additional user is added to a group that has these access rights. So we’ve not invented anything new here, rather we’re just using Unix groups and users in the usual way.

To implement the UI for user-switching and management we created a new user-managerd service that’s responsible for controlling which users or processes may alter the users on the device. This service is started on-demand whenever we need to create, remove or change the current user. The user-managerd API documentation is available on our developer site. In addition, we created the sailfish-access-control component to help check whether a user belongs to a certain group or not. This is used for checking permissions at the application level. The sailfish-access-control component provides both glib (C) and Qt (QML) interfaces. In order to implement the user interface changes we needed, we also enhanced nemo-qml-plugin-systemsetting by adding the UserModel and UserInfo components. These provide access to the underlying data structures and user-managerd service APIs. Some systemd system services such as Connman have been made aware of the active user through systemd-logind, controlled via user-managerd. When the user is changed a new set of connectivity rules is loaded. All systemd user services are stopped and started when a user switch occurs.

Sometimes it’s necessary to clean up files and settings or move them around when updating software. We have our own oneshot project for this, which manages the execution of relevant scripts on device boot. Originally oneshot was designed to understand only one user so we had to change it to take additional users into account. We needed a way to allow the same changes to be applied for all users and thus we added the –all-users argument to the add-oneshot command which you may have noticed if you’ve ever explored any Sailfish OS spec files. This has been implemented to iterate though the existing users and schedule the same oneshot script for each of them. We also needed a way to create oneshots that are fired for new users when the user is created. Another argument, –new-users, was added for this. It marks the oneshot script to run and then when the user session for a new user starts, the oneshot is scheduled for that user. During this process two additional arguments were also added, –user and –uid, to allow oneshots to be executed for specific users. In practice we’ve found they’re rarely used as it’s much more common to need a oneshot that affects all users or only future users.

A similar situation arose for systemd unit files. These are a nice way to describe background services and their dependencies, but prior to this release we often built them with the assumption that there would only ever be one user on the device. In practice this meant that many of our systemd units had User=nemo in them. Sometime this was because the service was really meant to be a session service run under the control of the session manager instead of the system manager, but which for some reason was implemented as a system service. One situation where this arose was for services activated by the system D-Bus, but which had the characteristics of user services. After the multi-user upgrade this was no longer acceptable and we had to find ways to have them run as system services (running as a system user) or move them inside the user session to be run as user services. In the latter case that may have involved moving a service’s data and settings inside the home directory, for example.

To achieve all the above we ended up having to update and fix a large number of packages. Many packages needed updating so they no longer used hardcoded paths to user-specific directories. The flashable Sailfish OS software images no longer require knowledge of who the primary user of the device is. The hardware access permissions come from the droid-hal (hardware adaptation layer). The droid-hal groups are applied to newly created users before a user logs in. This approach applies to all devices. All Sailfish system users now come from the sailfish-setup package. The groups to which a user may belong are also now created by sailfish-setup rather than being baked into the image.

There are some things that could have been achieved more simply using an upgraded systemd, but that’s still on our roadmap. No promises yet on the systemd upgrade schedule.

Finally, let’s return to Android App support. Additional users do not currently have rights to open Android Apps, install new ones, or remove old ones. The decision to do it this way was made so that we could simplify scoping of the overall task, allowing us to deliver the new shared-user feature to market and for customers. We’re looking at ways to improve this further in the future.

I’m very excited about this new feature and already looking forward to what the future will bring. It’s a major feature upgrade and the whole team working on this deserves a big hand for making it all happen.

The post Shared mobile devices appeared first on Jolla Blog.

by Jussi Maaniitty at October 20, 2020 09:00

October 19, 2020

/e/ foundation

Leaving Apple & Google: Share your feedback and new collaboration with Gigaset

Leaving Apple & Google:

  • Contribute to the project by sharing your feedback!
  • Welcome to the Gigaset GS290

Contribute to the project by sharing your feedback!

As a reminder, we are currently conducting an anonymous segmentation survey to better understand our user base regarding technology and privacy related services. This will, in turn, allow us to continue to improve the OS and services we offer as well as help us find more people for whom /e/OS would be a good fit.

The survey is available in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish. If you would like to participate and share about your experience with /e/ you can follow the link here.

Your feedback is invaluable to the success of the project!

Welcome to the Gigaset GS290

We are pleased to announce that we have completed porting /e/OS to the Gigaset GS290!
If you don’t know Gigaset, this company has been manufacturing communication products since 1941 and is most likely one of the last European brand producing its phones in their own facility, located in Bocholt, Germany.
We believe that the “Made in Germany” quality seal along with /e/OS will be a winning combination.
The GS290 boasts an extra-large display: 6.3″, 19.5:9 FHD + V-notch display, a powerful octa-core processor with 4G LTE, a high-resolution 16-MP + 2-MP dual camera and a long-lasting 4700-mAh lithium polymer battery with fast charging.
If you are interested in buying an /e/ GS290, let us know, we might have something coming up for you…

Support the project!

User’s data privacy and finding alternatives to regain control over our data has never been a more pressing issue than it is today. The timing is great to build something new!

Your contribution is key to the success of an ambitious project like ours!

Here’s how you can help:

Contribute, test & report bugs in /e/OS

Share on social media

Join the Community

Donate

by admin at October 19, 2020 09:10

October 17, 2020

FreeYourGadget

Gadgetbridge 0.48.0: Three completely new devices supported

Gadgetbridge 0.48.0 has been tagged and will appear on F-Droid soon! As always, this can take a few days.

Six code contributors and twenty one translators have contributed more then 130 commits to the latest release of Gadgetbridge, bringing support for three new devices:

  • The Sony SWR12 bands
  • Lefun Smart Bands
  • Nut

The Nut devices use the Nordic firmware update protocol (DFU) by using the official nordic library. This enabled us to also use it for other devices like the like the PineTime (InfiniTime), and probably more devices in the future. PineTime InfitiTime firmware's music control, being recently improved, also got improved support in Gadgetbridge. All of the work mentioned in this paragraph was contributed by Taavi Eomäe. Thanks Taavie!

A last minute change also adds experimental and untested support for the Amazfit Band 5. If you have the device, please try it and report bugs!

On the Fossil Hybrid HR front, support for the latest firmware version was added. For testing and debugging there is now a new activity that allows to send and receive files from/to the watch, something you should only try if you know what you are doing, as it might damage your watch, break your fonts or even worse.

After recent regression, the Find your phone feature has been made working on Android 10 again, thanks to previous work on Companion Device Manager pairing support.

Sports Activities detailed view can now be shared as full screen picture, including the intensity and heart-rate chart view.

We have also added initial support for list of activities for each day. These are not based on recorded activities or GPS, but are detected by number of steps and intensity, as recorded. Parameters of the detection can be tweaked in the Charts Preferences. And, in order to calculate and display correct distance from collected steps, step length has been added to the About You menu.

For all user-facing changes since the previous blog post, check the following list:

0.48.0

  • Initial support for Sony SWR12
  • Initial support for Lefun Smart Bands
  • Initial support for Nut devices
  • InfiniTime: Improved music support for latest firmware
  • Fossil Hybrid HR: Fixes and better support for newer firmwares
  • Fossil Hybrid HR: Debug activity for dumping and sending resources to the watch
  • Huami: Improve style of sports activity lists
  • Add sport activity list tab in charts
  • Allow sharing of sports activity summaries as image (full scroll view)
  • Weather: Fix wind speed and direction not being passed properly
  • Fix find your phone feature on Android 10 (need companion device pairing)

0.47.2

  • Amazfit Bip S: Send sunrise and sunset on latest firmware if enabled
  • Huami: Support new firmware update protocol (fixes firmware flashing with firmware 2.1.1.50/4.1.5.55 on Amazfit Bip S)
  • Huami: Allow flashing latest GPS firmware
  • InfiniTime: Add support for music control
  • Pebble: Fix steps on home screen widget
  • Bangle.js: Fix issue where call state reporting was corrupted
  • Add charts to sport activity summary view
  • Add missing icons for new sport activity types

0.47.1

  • Huami: Add new activity types found in recent Bip S firmware
  • Huami: Many improvements to the activity summary view, including a global view for all devices, filtering per activity type and much more
  • Huami: Prevent generating broken elevation data when they are not sent by the device
  • Amazfit Bip S: Allow flashing more font files and GPS almanac (only cep worked before)
  • Pinetime-JF: Recognize device if it announces itself as InfiniTime
  • ZeTime: Fix weather forecast icons on older firmwares, try to send weather even if no firmware version was detected
  • HPlus: Improve Unicode, notification lenth and weather support
  • Fix warnings and colors for AboutScreen

by Petr Vaněk at October 17, 2020 22:00

Fairphone

iFixit Guest Blog: What comes after a 10/10 score?

Editor’s Note: This is a guest feature from Dorothea Kessler, Communications Manager of iFixit Europe. iFixit is a global online repair community renowned for open source repair manuals and product teardowns. They awarded Fairphone 3 a perfect 10 out of 10 repairability score.


By now you know the consumer cycle: another year, another phone, right? But Fairphone isn’t one to follow the crowd. Their newest offering, the Fairphone 3+, is an upgraded version of the 3—one of only two phones to ever earn a 10/10 iFixit repairability score (Fairphone made the other one, too). So we were wondering: how do you “plus” a perfect score?

Thinking outside the box

Digital detox is trending, and the number of consumers who want to avoid waste and consume more consciously, or upgrade less often, is increasing. Trends like these are positive for the people, and for the planet. And the more repairable a device is, the longer it thus lasts, the better.

Still, consumer electronics have a long way to go in that regard (trust us, we know what we’re talking about), though some manufacturers prove that a device can be both modern and repairable—or upgradeable. The HP EliteBook line, and the latest Mac Pro, are some of our favorite examples.

 
This is what a perfectly repairable phone looks like – The Fairphone 3+.

Portable gadgets though are often the worst of the bunch. There are only two phones to have earned a repairability score of 10/10 from iFixit: the Fairphone 3 and its predecessor. Both encourage their owners to repair them when they break. Both are foundational pieces of Fairphone’s vision for a circular economy. We need this kind of bold thinking, and we’re happy to see these phones still going strong.

A phone is greater than the sum of its parts

With the recently announced Fairphone 3+, Fairphone’s message gets clear: if you feel the urge to upgrade, you shouldn’t have to upgrade your entire phone. Instead, upgrade only the parts that you want to renew—by picking up a screwdriver, and simply doing it yourself!

 
iFixit tore down the Fairphone 3+, and as you can see, it’s pretty much a Fairphone 3 with a higher amount of recycled plastic, and new camera modules that upgrade from a 12- to a 48-megapixel main camera, and from an 8- to a 16-megapixel selfie camera.

Modular smartphones existed before the Fairphone, but none of them followed this concept of modularity. Google’s Project Ara, the LG G5 and the Moto Z instead relied on huge modules that could be swapped without opening the phone—which made their designs bulkier and more compromised than they might have been otherwise.

Fairphone though, isn’t afraid to let their users whip out a screwdriver, which means fewer design compromises, and a modular design that not only awakens the DIY spirits of the phone owner, but also leads to a long-term and thus more sustainable usage of the phone. If you ask us, that’s the best possible win-win situation.

 
The camera modules in the Fairphone 3+ (right) are the main difference to its predecessor (left), and they’re downward compatible.

“We highly appreciate it when long-lasting product design—and a circular life cycle—are key determinants for a manufacturer like Fairphone”, says Matthias Mayer, Managing Director at iFixit Europe, “as they are key to the Right to Repair. To make those determinants an industry-standard, entrepreneurs with shared values, politics and society need to work together.”

That’s exactly why iFixit has partnered with Fairphone. In the past, we’ve created Fairphone repair guides and supplied all kinds of replacement modules, and today is no different. We’re selling the new 3+ camera modules in our European store—and we’re joining Fairphone’s Modular Take-Back Program to make it easier for German customers to send old modules back.

There are plenty of examples of what not to do in the smartphone world, so it’s a breath of fresh air to be able to praise thoughtful design. Far from resting on their 10/10 laurels, we’re pleased to see Fairphone push for ever more repairability. Today camera upgrades, tomorrow, a greener world!

The post iFixit Guest Blog: What comes after a 10/10 score? appeared first on Fairphone.

by Dorothea Kessler at October 17, 2020 11:40

October 16, 2020

Fairphone

Meet the changemakers: Fairphone Ambassador Heidi Andersson

We’re on a journey to change the electronics industry – and we’re not alone. While the Fairphone is a physical expression of the possibility of change, it also happens to be a great storytelling device that connects us with inspiring changemakers from all over.

In this series, we want to shine a light on our ambassadors: A group of bright individuals that share our vision of a fairer future and contribute to sustainable change in their own meaningful way. Next up is Heidi Andersson, a blogger and arm wrestling champion working to go fossil-fuel free by 2025.

Hi there Heidi. To kick this off, tell us a bit about yourself.

 

Born in 1981, I’m an eleven-time world champion in arm wrestling. When I was a child I dreamed about becoming a world-class arm wrestler and a world-class planetary caretaker! Together with my husband Björn Ferry (Olympic Champion in biathlon), I have the goal to become fossil-fuel-free by the year 2025. We want to strive for a sustainable lifestyle. We live in Storuman, Lapland, in the northern part of Sweden with our son Dante and our cat Kurt Spurt. In the last 5 years, we managed to reduce our fossil-fuel emissions by 80%.

That’s an incredible achievement – and how do we fit into your sustainability journey?

A friend of mine told me about the world’s most sustainable smartphone – the Fairphone – and I just loved the concept and ideas around the phone. “We believe that care for the environment and people should be a natural part of doing business” – Sounds about right to me.

You’re fully committed to a greener, fairer future. So tell us – was there a specific moment in your life that prompted this?

I’m the sixth generation that grew up in the small village of Ensamheten – which can loosely be translated to “solitude” or “loneliness” by the way – alongside my relatives. Our little community has had 18 inhabitants most of the time, so I’d say the name fits. Anyways, in this village, my strong values for life and sustainability were born. My biggest hero was my grandfather, Tore Andersson. He taught me that everything in life is built up in circles and cycles; that we are all a part of this awesome world and that responsibility is something big, strong, and beautiful. I’m very thankful for the time I had with him and that he and Björn met before he passed away.

Thank you for sharing this; your grandfather’s wise words are valuable for all of us. Let’s chat about how you’ve applied them to your own life; what are some of your driving passions?

I can’t live without my son. I love my freedom and being with my husband. Besides this, I’m passionate about arm wrestling and sustainability! I wanted to see how strong I could be and I wanted to be ready for the future. I love to train. I mostly train together with the students in the arm wrestling school in Storuman, just for fun and health. I also train children. I’m an Honorary Doctor of Forest Sciences at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. My husband and I are the owners of a 1,000-hectare forest. We work in the forest together and do some of the smaller jobs ourselves. Some of the forest is biotope protected and no forestry is conducted. Everything you can do with fossil fuels, you can also do with forest: fuel, cloth, buildings, etc.

That sounds pretty wonderful! How does your Fairphone 3 help with what you do?

I can run my business from the train, or sometimes from our electric car in the forest (when the connection is ok). I can always take great photos that I use for social media and presentations. My Fairphone is an important part of my freedom. But my son Dante knows more about the phone than me! He loves Fairphone and hopes to do an internship there one day.

You take lots of photos on your Fairphone 3 – what are some of your favorites?

 
Family portrait, together with my son Dante and my husband Björn in our ecological house.

 
The view from our home. My dream as a child was to be a world-class arm wrestler and to become a world-class planetary caretaker living in an ecological house.

 
Just your average training session with my club and the students from the arm wrestling school.

Before we part ways, what advice do you have for people who want to live more sustainably?

Start by doing a fossil fuel weigh in. In Sweden, we have some free fossil-fuel inventory tools you can use like www.klimatkontot.se. Then focus on the parts that have the biggest impact – for us it was transportation.
Thank you so much for your time, Heidi. We’re excited to be a part of your journey to a fairer, freer, forested future!

—-

Check out Heidi’s journey to fossil freedom on her website or her personal blog. Stay up to date with her on Instagram via @heidiarmstark

For more on Heidi, and our other Fairphone Ambassadors, stay tuned to this blog or head on over to our community page.

The post Meet the changemakers: Fairphone Ambassador Heidi Andersson appeared first on Fairphone.

by Lora at October 16, 2020 17:18

Purism

Specify Form-Factors in Your Librem 5 Apps

While more and more applications are being redesigned to take smartphones like the Librem 5 into account, PureOS still offers lots of desktop applications which are not ready to run on such devices yet.

As a user you want to know which applications are relevant to install, so PureOS Store will by default only present mobile-ready applications, while still letting you opt-into showing all applications to take full advantage of the Librem 5’s convergeant docked mode. As a user you also want to know which applications are relevant to run at a given time, so Phosh will let you run desktop-only applications only when the phone is docked.

This requires the applications to provide some information on which form-factors they can handle, if you are an application developer and you want your applications to work as expected on the Librem 5, please provide the relevant information as shown below.

To make your application appear in PureOS Store, add the following lines to your AppStream metainfo:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<component type="desktop"><custom>
    <value key="Purism::form_factor">workstation</value>
    <value key="Purism::form_factor">mobile</value>
  </custom></component>

 

Convergent app in PureOS Store

To make your application appear in Phosh, add the following lines to your desktop entry:

[Desktop Entry]
…
# Translators: Do NOT translate or transliterate this text (these are enum types)!
X-Purism-FormFactor=Workstation;Mobile;
…
Convergent app icons in Phosh

If you don’t add these, your application will be assumed to only be compatible with the desktop mode.

You may be intrigued by the Purism namespace in these solutions, we came up with these ad-hoc solutions to provide the form-factor compatibility information we need until better fleshed out solutions are ready. You can read more about this issue here:

The post Specify Form-Factors in Your Librem 5 Apps appeared first on Purism.

by Adrien Plazas at October 16, 2020 15:02

NewPipe

NewPipe 0.20.1 released: YouTube search fixed

So this is a “hot” fix, as they say. Since the previous post was so long (too long) this will be positively tiny in comparison. Let’s dive right into it.

YouTube

  • Decryption error (“Could not load decryption code for the Youtube service.”): When you try to open video details for any video, you could randomly encounter this error, because YouTube doesn’t send over the relevant data. (YouTube is a bit moody like that.)

    • We haven’t caught the culprit yet, so for now we just retry a few times to bypass this error.
  • Search error (“Could not get ytInitialData”): When you enter a search term and tap enter, sometimes no search results are shown, and an error snackbar is shown at the bottom instead. (Maybe not moody, but shy?)

    • YouTube sometimes provides data in a slightly different form, which NewPipe can now understand and process correctly.

SoundCloud

  • Failing SoundCloud test: A reference account that NewPipe runs internal tests on changed its name at some point (sneaky sneaky!), causing those tests to fail. The name has been updated.

  • Parsing of trailing slash: URLs which have a forward slash at the end are not supported consistently by SoundCloud, so NewPipe now removes it before using the URL for further processing.

That’s it! Enjoy your day.

October 16, 2020 04:00

October 15, 2020

Pine 64

Update: new hacktober gear

Let me begin this month’s community update by teasing the November update, in which I’ll talk about the next generation of SoCs and our plans for the future. If you haven’t done so yet, then now is the right time to subscribe to our blog and follow the news on the PINE64 Telegram news channel. I’ll be mostly focusing on hardware in this month’s update, I’ve been out of the software development...

Source

by Lukasz Erecinski at October 15, 2020 11:43

October 14, 2020

This Week in F-Droid

Adding React Native Apps to F-Droid

React Native is a popular open-source app development framework that makes it easy to build cross-platform applications using the platform’s native UI components. This makes it an ideal choice for developers building apps for all platforms.

That’s why we chose it when we started working on the new EteSync Notes app. It enabled us to build an app in a very short time reusing 100% of the code on Android, iOS, the web, and once we release the desktop clients, the desktop too.

Being an open-source project ourselves, and long-time (very happy) users of F-Droid, one of our main concerns before building the app was: can react-native applications be built on F-Droid? Looking online we couldn’t find a clear answer. We then looked at the fdroiddata repository we saw some mentions of react-native, which led us to react native apps that are available on F-Droid. So we know it can be done, we were just missing the how.

The rest of this post assumes you are familiar with the F-Droid metadata files and how to build normal Android applications.

There are a few main challenges with building React Native applications on F-Droid:

  1. React Native apps have two build and dependency management systems (the React Native one, and the Android one).
  2. React Native apps require a more recent NodeJS environment than is available on F-Droid.
  3. React Native apps have pre-built dependencies that are shipped using the JavaScript dependency management systems, and we need to tell F-Droid these components are actually FLOSS and compatible with F-Droid.

Before we go on with explaining the important components and how they play together, here is the working EteSync Notes spec file for your reference.

The first thing you need to take care of is the subdir directive. React Native applications have their android build system in a subdirectory of the repo rather than the root. It’s usually android/app, but it may be different in your setup.

The next thing we need, which may not be required in your case, is to get a recent enough version of node and yarn. F-Droid uses Debian Stretch for the build system, which didn’t even have a recent enough node version in backports. So the easiest way to get node was using a pre-built binary, and verify its checksum, and then installing yarn using npm. This is how it looks like:

    sudo:
      - curl -Lo node.tar.xz https://nodejs.org/dist/v10.18.1/node-v10.18.1-linux-x64.tar.xz
      - echo "8cc40f45c2c62529b15e83a6bbe0ac1febf57af3c5720df68067c96c0fddbbdf node.tar.xz"
        | sha256sum -c -
      - tar xJf node.tar.xz
      - cp -a node-v10.18.1-linux-x64/. /usr/local/
      - npm -g install yarn

The next step is to install all of the JavaScript dependencies, this can be done using the init directive, like so: init: yarn install.

Now we should have everything we need to get our React Native app to build, though the builds will still fail. The reason for that is that F-Droid automatically detects potentially non-free dependencies in the build, and won’t let the build continue if found. Therefore, the next thing we should do is to tell it to automatically get rid of all of the non-free dependencies pulled by our JavaScript deps, like so:

    scandelete:
      - node_modules/

Now we are making progress, and all of the potentially non-free dependencies are being removed. Though the build will still fail because some of these dependencies were actually needed! Now, the responsibility is on us to find and make sure the deps that we require and that are indeed FLOSS and F-Droid compatible. The most common error is about an “unrecognized maven repository” pointing to ../node_modules/.... Assuming all of your JavaScript dependencies are indeed FLOSS, these can be safely ignored, as they just mean that the deps come from a JavaScript dependency instead of through Maven (again, very common). We will deal with these in a moment. The second, more serious issue is about .jar, .aar and .so files being removed. Here you need to take extra care to make sure that these files are indeed FLOSS, come from a trusted source, and are just pre-compiled for ease of distribution. Once you found all of the occurrences of the two issues above, you can tell F-Droid to ignore them. For example, this is what we have in EteSync Notes:

    scanignore:
      - android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/jsc-android
      - node_modules/react-native/android/com/facebook/react/react-native/*/
      - node_modules/react-native-appearance/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/react-native-reanimated/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/react-native-safe-area-context/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/react-native-screens/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/react-native-sodium/libsodium/*/lib/libsodium.so
      - node_modules/react-native-vector-icons/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/@react-native-community/async-storage/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/@react-native-community/masked-view/android/build.gradle
      - node_modules/@react-native-community/netinfo/android/build.gradle

The first three lines are required by all React Native applications. They are just the main React Native deps, which are indeed FLOSS. The rest should be added depending on your own dependencies as outlined above. Please note that some Expo modules depend on non-free components, so they may be incompatible with F-Droid.

This is it, your app should now build for F-Droid. Just make sure to go through the contribution guidelines to make sure everything is in order.

Closing notes

As you can see, it’s quite easy to build React Native applications on F-Droid once you know how. However, there are a few improvements that could go into F-Droid that would make the process easier. It would be great if the F-Droid build machines will include an up-to-date Node, and potentially maybe a directive to include some of the above steps automatically.

The above is everything we needed to do in order to get EteSync Notes to correctly build on F-Droid. We, at EteSync, are trying to make it easier to build FLOSS, end-to-end encrypted, and privacy respecting applications, which is why we recently released Etebase. If you share our passion of protecting user freedoms and privacy, please come and join our community.

by tasn at October 14, 2020 00:00

October 13, 2020

Purism

Hand Drawn 2D Animation with PureOS and Librem Laptops

Professional animation is not just possible but ideal with free software, this story shares what is possible running PureOS, Librem laptops, and accessories. I have been using free software for 6 years and each year these freedom respecting professional tools I use seem to improve faster than the commercial proprietary pace.

Krita, as an example, released an animation feature that made it the perfect tool for making rough animations. That same year, the software Toonz, that was used by the legendary Studio Ghibli for clean up and coloring purpose, was released as free software under the name of OpenToonz. Nice, with just these two features and tools released, I had everything I needed to do traditional animations again with my Librem based digital studio. Below I will go through the workflow of making a simple hand made 2D animation.

This particular animation was commissioned to me, during the summer, by a young french film production called Baze Production. The goal of this project was to make a cute production identity intro in the same style as Pixar or Illumination Studios, but with hand made animations instead of 3D computer graphics. For that matter, I used 2 Librem laptops and 2 Wacom tablets.

Designing the character

The first step, in this project, was to design the character. The requirements I have been given were pretty straight forward : The character has to be a goat and it has to be cute.

Based on that, I made a few character designs on Krita and the following one was selected.

Drawing the storyboard

Animating is a lot about observing and understanding how to decompose a movement. Therefore, before diving into the animation, I watched many “cute goats” videos online. I was impressed by how popular those videos are on the internet!

After a few hours of watching cute baby goats videos, I had a rough idea about how they move but I didn’t really know what our goat would do on those “BAZE” letters. The first requirement was that the goat enters the screen from the left, jumps on the letter “B” and sits on it. Then, I put myself in the head of a goat and thought that the “E” was flatter and wider than the “B” so it would be more comfortable to sit there. I could have made the goat appear from the right side of the screen but I though it would be fun to see it jump across the different letters. Especially as the “A” is a tricky one to stand on top of.

As this small animation is a single shot, instead of making a proper storyboard, I ended up drawing a few key frames that would give a first impression of what the animation would be.

Doing the rough animation

Based on those few key frames, I made a 12 fps rough animation on Krita. This is a pretty long process but it is the one I prefer doing as it feels like giving life to this cute animal. I always think that there is something magical with animations.

When I do sketches or rough animations, I don’t need to be extremely precise with my lines and I prefer using a classic graphics tablet that is standing on my table and where I do not have my hand over the screen. This way, it lets me keep my eye on the entire canvas while drawing.

For making this rough animation, I used my Librem 13 with a simple Wacom Bamboo tablet.

The technique I use for animating is to draw some key frames, dispatch them across the timeline in order to get an idea of the rhythm of the overall movement, then I draw the in-between frames until I get to a smooth result.

I usually animate at 12 frames per second and if I want to do a full speed 24 fps animation, I do a second pass of in-between drawings. For this particular video, I stayed at 12 fps.

Here is what the rough animation looked like :

Clean up and coloring

I personally love the style of hand made rough animations and I would often end an animation project at this point. However, for this one, I was asked to do a clean and colored animation.

For this kind of work, I need to be a lot more precise with my lines and so, I used a Wacom Cintiq tablet connected to my second Librem laptop. Both laptops data get constantly synchronized through the use of Unison and they share a single mouse, thanks to Barrier. This way, it is easy for me to move from one computer to another. I can even copy and paste from one computer to another. It feels just like if I had 4 screens on a single computer.

OpenToonz is a beautiful and powerful software. I am pretty new to it and I still have a lot to learn and to practice in order to use it correctly. For this project, I have made the line art and coloring on the same vector layer while the best practice seems to be doing the line art on a vector layer, in order to have smooth editable lines, and the color on a raster layer for it to be well applied and detailed with a brush. I will experiment more with that on a future project.

Here is a video of the final animation.

The post Hand Drawn 2D Animation with PureOS and Librem Laptops appeared first on Purism.

by François Téchené at October 13, 2020 13:35

Jolla

Sailfish OS Pallas-Yllästunturi is now available

Finnish Lapland has the cleanest air in the world and Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park in Lapland is Finland’s most popular national park. The landscape of Pallastunturi Fells has been chosen as one of Finland’s national landscapes. The park’s location north of the Arctic Circle means that it experiences the typical weather and natural phenomena associated with seasonal changes. On clear evenings and nights, planets, stars and the northern lights may be visible in the sky.

The 3.4 Pallas-Yllästunturi release includes several updates that enhance the experience on-device, enable new possibilities for developers, and incorporate new features for our corporate customers. Several improvements in this release were developed in collaboration with Open Mobile Platform for Aurora OS. Jolla appreciates the collaborative efforts of its partners and community in making Sailfish OS even better.

Browser moving forward

We’ve upgraded the browser engine to Gecko ESR52. This makes using the Sailfish OS browser already much more enjoyable! This isn’t the end of the story though, and is in fact just the first step of our plan to gradually upgrade the browser. As the browser is open source, some of you may have already noticed from the repositories that we are continuing to upgrade the engine for upcoming releases. Newer browser engine versions bring in thousands of bug fixes, improvements to the rendering and compatibility with various newer browser technologies.

The engine upgrade also brings with it a positive effect on our email client, improving the rendering of HTML-based emails and ensuring it conforms better to common web standards. Copy and paste of HTML email text is also now available.

Developer Offering

We’ve included experimental support for the Rust programming language in this release. This addition is related to the upcoming browser upgrades, but we will experiment with using Rust in other areas as well. We welcome and appreciate all comments from the community about the behaviour and use of this addition and encourage you to share your experiences on the forum.

In preparation for future needs we are also releasing experimental support for 64-bit hardware (aarch64). This experiment is aimed at potential upcoming devices and is not currently used by any existing hardware. It should be noted by our development community that we do not consider the aarch64 ABI stable yet. Recompiling applications might be needed later when the 64-bit architecture becomes officially supported.

We invite our partners and community to take this into use where devices support it (e.g. HW ports) and to share your feedback via our forum.

We’ve also updated our Notification API so that the interface now includes progress information that can be displayed on the Events view.

Corporate features

Sailfish OS now allows multiple users per device. The multiuser case will be explained and described in more detail in an upcoming blog post, but briefly, in addition to the default user (admin) up to 6 additional users can now be added having more limited rights and capabilities.

Managing Sailfish OS-based devices is now easier with the new release. We’ve extended the functionality of mobile device management (MDM) with the ability to configure Active Sync accounts. ActiveSync accounts can also now be set up using a personal SSL certificate.

Hourly weather, enhanced controls for call handling and video playback

The weather information on Sailfish OS is provided by the Foreca weather forecast service. The Foreca API recently changed allowing us to integrate new services into Sailfish OS. We’ve added an hourly weather forecast to the Events view. Forecast information can be seen by expanding the weather banner. Tapping the banner in expanded state toggles between the daily and hourly forecasts.

In this release we are continuing our effort to improve the call experience. In our earlier 3.2 Torronsuo release we improved the experience when rejecting a call and included features such as call reminders and quick messages. In this new Pallas-Yllästunturi release we have reworked the whole incoming call experience to further reduce the confusion reported by new users when handling incoming calls. Now just flick horizontally in either direction to answer a call or flick up to decline.

There are a bunch of other improvements to device interaction in this release. The full details can be found in the release notes, but here are just a couple of further highlights:

  • 10 second forward and rewind actions have been added to the video player;
  • the Romanian language and keyboard are now included.

Security and device settings

Automatic (scheduled) backup to selected cloud services is now available in this release, so you don’t have to remember to backup your data manually any more. Automatic backup currently stores your accounts, bookmarks, local contacts, calendar events, messages, notes and call history. Online data like emails are not backed up, but can be restored by syncing the respective accounts. Note that Gallery images and videos are not yet included in the backup.

All new devices (Xperia X/XA2/10) have home encryption turned on by default. The encryption enforces the use of a security code. The security code setup is presented during the first startup of a new device, after flashing a device or after a factory reset.

We think the Pallas-Yllästunturi release of Sailfish OS has improvements that all of our users can benefit from and will appreciate, and we certainly hope you enjoy the upgrade.

Detailed release notes are available in our forum.

The post Sailfish OS Pallas-Yllästunturi is now available appeared first on Jolla Blog.

by Jussi Maaniitty at October 13, 2020 12:00

October 09, 2020

Tutanota

Get your own email domain with Tutanota!

Tutanota is one of the few services that lets you add multiple own domains under any paid plan. Get custom email addresses @yourcompany the easy way and build customer trust by hosting your professional and secure email account with the encrypted email service Tutanota.

October 09, 2020 00:00

October 08, 2020

Purism

Fund Your App to Vote for the Future

Fund Your App is available for app selection and donation from https://puri.sm/fund-your-app/.

A common question asked about the Librem 5 phone is “How many apps are available?” This can be answered simply by “Many thousands, asterisk.” What most people desire is a dozen or so applications they may need and a handful more they want, but there are other variables too.

Market need

Purism offers product to many markets, B2C (Business to Consumer) market is the most publicly facing market and when bringing an innovative new product to market–like the Librem 5–it includes early adopters, tastemakers, influencers, enthusiasts, and professionals. The B2C market is where the question of number of apps is most often asked. And we have many thousands*.

B2B (Business to Business) and B2G (Business to Governments) are markets that are much less publicly facing, but only require two or three apps beyond the core basics. These few apps are easily tested and can be verified to work for large-scale deployments.

Native or External

Native applications are defined as a local application written and integrated into the operating system PureOS, these are what we also call “pixel perfect” applications to showcase that they are curated applications for the best user experience. There are two approaches to native applications; Porting, direct port of the application from a different platform; and Adapting, modifying a desktop application to make it adaptive (usable on a small screen).

External applications are websites that can be rendered in an isolated application, emulated application from Android, or even an application that is served from the Internet (cloud).

As you can quickly see, the number of applications are ever increasing from Native as soon as you include Web Apps from external sources.

Mobile or Desktop

One area where Purism’s vision and innovation far outpaces Apple or Google is around true convergence. With the Librem 5 phone you are running a full-blown desktop computer in a mobile form factor. If you plug it into a keyboard, mouse, and monitor you will have PureOS and the many thousands of applications available as you would from any desktop computer. This means that we are starting with many thousands of applications that “just work” as a desktop application; where to be usable from a finger on touch-screen in a mobile form factor separated from the monitor, is just adapting it using Purism’s libhandy library.

Number of Apps

Even though we have many thousands of applications* available today within PureOS, we recognize that to increase in the B2C market it takes consistent effort and perseverance to transition that asterisk away from the answer. The asterisk can be removed when the applications the majority needs are available natively or as optimized web apps, while we march on toward applications the majority wants.

Fund Your App

To bring awareness to this we are launching a Fund Your App page to allow people to vote on applications they desire with their wallet, so we can fund greater development directly advancing on a regular release schedule with an ever increasing number of applications.

Fund Your App is available for app selection and donation from https://puri.sm/fund-your-app/.

The post Fund Your App to Vote for the Future appeared first on Purism.

by Purism at October 08, 2020 15:28

Purism Launches Fund Your App Page

SAN FRANCISCO, October 8, 2020 — Purism, a Social Purpose Company (SPC) focusing on security and privacy with its hardware and software, has launched a Fund Your App campaign to allow people to vote for the mobile phone apps they desire to see working on the Librem 5 phone.

With an ever increasing number of people realizing that their mobile phones are exploiting their personal digital lives the demand to have a convenient alternative that protects people is growing daily. The Librem 5 phone is the foundation in which society can see that alternative become reality.

Fund Your App allows people to select the applications they most use, and explains ways in which those applications can run on the Librem 5, natively or externally, allowing for even popular proprietary applications to run in protected isolation.

Purism’s Librem 5 phone running Purism’s PureOS–a Free Software Foundation Endorsed Distribution–offers the best possible security and privacy. The mass-produced Librem 5 phones begin shipping late November 2020.

Fund Your App ensures that Purism continues to advance development rapidly with focused effort based on user feedback of what applications the customers would like funds and see working sooner.

“Fund Your App is a great way to show how far we have come with the Librem 5 and PureOS, it also allows people to vote on what is our app development priority. It is such an exciting time where we are seeing rapid development and sizable growth around the Librem 5 phone.” — Todd Weaver, CEO and Founder of Purism.

Fund Your App is available for app selection and donation from https://puri.sm/fund-your-app/.

The post Purism Launches Fund Your App Page appeared first on Purism.

by Purism at October 08, 2020 07:45

October 07, 2020

/e/ foundation

Leaving Apple & Google: /e/OS is contributing to a more sustainable world, A look at what’s new in our user interface and FP3+ news

Leaving Apple & Google:

/e/OS is contributing to a more sustainable world, A look at what’s new in our user interface and FP3+ news

/e/OS redefines the mobile operating system paradigm for a more sustainable world

Two years ago, /e/OS was envisioned as a pro-privacy, fully deGoogled, mobile OS and associated online services. In addition to being a great alternative to Apple and Google, it is progressively paving the way to a better and more sustainable IT world…

Read all the details in our article on Medium.

/e/OS and the (not) Android user interface

Let’s have a look at the whys and whats of /e/OS user graphical interface: the launcher, the user interface consistency, the top-bar cleaning… and what’s in the works.

Read more here!

FP3+ & /e/OS, and newly supported devices

Here is a picture of one of the first boot of /e/OS on the FP3+!

The development is making good progress and we expect to have a fully functioning version on /e/-Android 10 by the end of the month.

By the way, pre-orders for the /e/-FP3+ are still opened!

/e/OS now supports new devices such as:
 
  • Samsung S III Neo
  • BQ Aquaris X2 & X2 Pro
  • Lenovo Yoga Tab 3 Plus & 3 Plus Wi-Fi

All supported devices at https://doc.e.foundation/devices

How can I contribute and support the /e/ project?

We are often asked how to contribute to the /e/ project and we are pleased to answer this question because users’ contributions are key to the success of an ambitious project like ours.
Now is the good time! There has never been so many questions and comments about user’s data privacy, Google, Apple and alternatives to regain control over data privacy… The timing is great and you can contribute in many ways:
Test /e/OS, report bugs, contribute to patches!
 
Everyone is welcome to report issues with /e/OS, and possible solutions. Just make sure you can reproduce the problem, post appropriate context information, if possible, some “logs” and ideally… a solution!
 
Help others! Join the global community!
 
 We have a growing community of users who are discussing their experience with /e/OS. Join now, you will be able to help others answer common or uncommon questions they have about /e/:

Join discussions, spread the word!

It’s important to share your experience on our forums, tell us about what you like, your frustrations… It helps us to identify improvements for the product and make it a Premium mobile ecosystem.

Also, please share the word! Every day, new users discover /e/ and love the project. We need all forces to ensure that as many people as possible learn about the project. We can’t count on mainstream media for this!

So share with friends and your community channels, talk about /e/ on social media, say why you like it!

You can also share what we post on Mastodon and Twitter.

Contribute financially!
 
With your help, we can support a growing team of passionate contributors, keep /e/ completely independent and make /e/OS sustainable over time.

Every donation helps the project to pursue additional developments, rent servers for compilation, rent servers to host your e.email account or the community forum, pay for domain names and other key expenses amongst other things.

If you can afford a recurring donation, become an /e/ Patron!

Otherwise, choose from the different donations options, and get a reward in return!

 
 

by admin at October 07, 2020 14:22

Purism

US Antitrust Report on Big Tech and Purism Comparison

As part of a top-to-bottom review of the online market, the US House Committee on the Judiciary initiated a bipartisan investigation into Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. Antitrust, also known as anticompetitive, is an area where regulators determine if the economic powers of business is healthy and allows competition to flourish. The 449-page report released today that thoroughly reviewed nearly 1.3 million documents, held seven separate hearings, and six hours of testimony from the CEOs of the four companies clearly shows anticompetitive behavior.

It’s about control

The report includes evidence concerning the extent to which these four companies have exploited, entrenched, and expanded their power of digital markets in anticompetitive and abusive ways; determining that each company is a gatekeeper of a key channel of distribution in the market. Controlling access to markets and the users of those markets is abuse and oppressive, while extracting valuable data from the people and businesses that rely on them.

“The effects of this significant and durable market power are costly. The Subcommittee’s series of hearings produced significant evidence that these firms wield their dominance in ways that erode entrepreneurship, degrade Americans’ privacy online, and undermine the vibrancy of the free and diverse press. The result is less innovation, fewer choices for consumers, and a weakened democracy.”

Nearly a century ago, Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis wrote: “We must make our choice. We may have democracy, or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we cannot have both .” Those words speak to us with great urgency today.

The (unsurprising) findings

  • 85% of Americans are concerned—either very concerned or somewhat concerned—about the amount of data online platforms store about them, and 81% are concerned that platforms are collecting and holding this data in order to build out more comprehensive consumer profiles.
  • Facebook has monopoly power in the market for social networking.
  • Google has a monopoly in the markets for general online search and search advertising.
  • Amazon has significant and durable market power in the U.S. online retail market.
  • Apple has significant and durable market power in the mobile operating system market.

Additionally, in the absence of adequate privacy guardrails in the United States, the persistent collection and misuse of consumer data is an indicator of market power online. Online platforms rarely charge consumers a monetary price—products appear to be “free” but are monetized through people’s attention or with their data. In the absence of genuine competitive threats, dominant firms offer fewer privacy protections than they otherwise would, and the quality of these services has deteriorated over time. As a result, consumers are forced to either use a service with poor privacy safeguards or forego the service altogether.

At a fundamental level, competition has been a key engine of economic activity in the US, resulting in the “pioneering of entire industries that, in time, come to employ millions and generate trillions.” This is especially true in the digital economy. Competition incentivizes incumbent and new entrants to build new technologies and improve business processes. It its absence, incumbent firms lack incentive to invest, slowing the rate of innovation across an industry. Lack of competition also results in eroded privacy and data protection.

Why Purism is different, point-by-point response from sections of the report

Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook are all “C” Corporations and they have a fiduciary responsibility to maximize shareholder value at all costs, even anticompetitive ones. Purism is a Social Purpose Company who enshrined its articles of incorporation to protect and respect society and it releases all its source code.

The four companies are gatekeepers that lock in control, exploiting and extracting concessions people would not normally consent to. Purism offers complete freedom to use its products and services in any way people desire without fear of control or exploitation.

These companies push network effects of platform lock in to create a barrier to entry since they refuse to be interoperable with other platforms. Purism offers all services with free and open source software that is interoperable based on standards and supports decentralized hosting between other platforms.

These companies push vendor lock-in so switching costs are prohibitive, as users contribute data (photos, social, reviews, personal information) that they are unable to export to switch creates platform lock-in. Purism offers full transparency, export ability from all its services, in addition offers its customers complete control of their entire digital life to change operating systems, applications, or services.

Data is another area these companies accumulate that reinforces their scalpel-like precision about new business opportunities and anticompetitive practices. Purism does not use third-party trackers, does not profit from nor exploit user data, and went so far as to include avoiding that practice in its articles of incorporation.

Innovation kill zones are the markets these companies operate in and no institutional investor will take a founder seriously when they desire to compete against these monopolistic four companies. Purism competes with a business model that has revenue and builds value across the market of privacy, security, and user freedom–the only areas of weakness in the kill zone of big tech.

The entrenched power of firms with weak privacy protections has created a kill zone around the market for products that enhance privacy online. Purism actively avoids using these four companies’ services to avoid such kill-zone tactics mentioned in the report.

Competitive advantage and differentiators are gobbled up by these four companies to never allow competition to rise. Purism offers a “poison pill” to these types of companies: if you want to compete with us you will have to release all your source code, giving Purism a longer growing period to compete head-to-head with the giants.

Persistent collection and misuse of consumer data is an indicator of market power in the digital economy. The best evidence of platform market power therefore is not prices charged but rather the degree to which platforms have eroded consumer privacy without prompting a response from the market. As scholars have noted, a platform’s ability to maintain strong networks while degrading user privacy can reasonably be considered equivalent to a monopolist’s decision to increase prices or reduce product quality.208 A firm’s dominance can enable it to abuse consumers’ privacy without losing customers. In the absence of genuine competitive threats, a firm offers fewer privacy protections than it otherwise would. In the process, it extracts more data, further entrenching its dominance.

Apple has used the concept of privacy as a shield by making changes in the name of privacy that at the same time give it a competitive advantage.

At Purism we recognize we are not just competing with the giants, but we are competing against the marketing budgets of the giants, where they continually use terms like “We care about your privacy” from Facebook or Apple, when they clearly do not, as the report proves.

The Mobile App Stores and Operating Systems

The report also has a section on Mobile App Stores, where unlike laptops or desktops, you almost exclusively must install applications through the vendor-controlled stores, thus reinforcing the gatekeeper control and exploitation. Purism offers the convenience of the PureOS Store with curated applications for your device, with all the freedoms to install applications from wherever you desire if you so choose.

Mobile operating systems also get a section in the report, and like the app stores, it is a duopoly of vendor lock-in and exploitative control. Purism uses PureOS on all devices, servers, laptops, desktops, and phone, where all the source code is released, thus offering the utmost security and privacy in a fully freedom-respecting operating system.

There are significant barriers to switching between the dominant mobile operating systems. As a general matter, consumers rarely switch mobile operating systems. SellCell’s 2019 survey found that more than 90 of users with iPhones tend to stick with Apple when they replace their current device. 544 In 2018 Consumer Intelligence Research Partners reported that more than 85 % of iOS users who purchased a new device purchased another iOS device, and more than 90% of Android users who bought a new device purchased a new Android device.

Apple’s co-founder and former CEO Steve Jobs advocated this lock-in approach, noting Apple should “[t]ie all of our products together, so we further lock customers into our ecosystem.”
Recently, Morningstar observed that people using Apple’s other products such as the Apple Watch and AirPods “lose significant functionality when paired with a smartphone other than the iPhone,” locking iPhone users into the iOS ecosystem. Competition regulators in the Netherlands explained that this strategy creates “path dependency” for consumers.

The report has a large section devoted to the mobile OS market and the barriers to entry for any new mobile OS, including number of apps, large enough user base, combined headset, and OS. Purism with PureOS that runs on laptops and mobile is taking a unique approach to compete in the market even against all the odds of anticompetitive practices, primarily starting with core applications and adapting (not porting nor rewriting) the thousands of existing applications in addition to offering convergence where PureOS as a mobile OS can be a complete desktop computer when using a keyboard, mouse, and monitor.

Restoring Competition in the Digital Economy

The report closes (in page 377 through 404) with section headers including:

  • Reduce Conflicts of Interest Thorough Structural Separations and Line of Business Restriction
  • Implement Rules to Prevent Discrimination, Favoritism, and Self-Preferencing
  • Promote Innovation Through Interoperability and Open Access (Interoperability and Data Portability)
  • Reduce Market Power Through Merger Presumptions
  • Create an Even Playing Field for the Free and Diverse Press
  • Prohibit Abuse of Superior Bargaining Power and Require Due Process
  • Restore the Antimonopoly Goals of the Antitrust Laws
  • Invigorate Merger Enforcement
    • Codify Bright-Line Rules and Structural Presumptions.in Concentrated Markets
    • Protect Potential Rivals, Nascent Competitors, and Startups
    • Strengthen Vertical Merger Doctrine
  • Rehabilitate Monopolization Law
  • Additional Measures to Strengthen the Antitrust Laws

The report also includes a shockingly long appendix of acquisitions by these four companies to clearly make the point of market dominance through crushing competition by acquisition that goes from page 405 to 449.

Purism, a social purpose corporation, offers hardware, software, and services as an alternative to the exploitative, abusive, monopolistic, products and services offered by these companies. Support the change you’d like to see by supporting Purism and the products we produce.

The post US Antitrust Report on Big Tech and Purism Comparison appeared first on Purism.

by Todd Weaver at October 07, 2020 00:52

October 05, 2020

This Week in F-Droid

Publishing an F-Droid Repo using a Hardware Security Module

The following is a tutorial for publishing apps through F-Droid using a hardware security module (HSM). The HSM used in this post is a Nitrokey HSM2. Other hardware tokens should have similar functionality, but you’ll have to use different commands for interacting with the HSM.

Storing signing keys in an HSM provides major security advantages once a key is generated inside a HSM it can never be extracted in plain text form. Instead the data to be signed is sent to the HSM which will produce the signature with the internally held key material. They also apply some tamper resistance technologies which makes physical extraction of the key very difficult.

A signing key for an Android application is part of the identity of said app. As a security measure an update for an app can only be installed when the new apk is signed with the same private key as the old one. Storing the keys in an HSM makes sure that even if an attacker compromises your infrastructure they will not be able to steal the signing keys. In fact there’s never any ambiguity if an attacker might have gotten access to the keys. The physical HSM would need to be stolen and that is at least obvious at that point. The intruder could still possibly use the HSM to sign malicious apps though.

F-Droid has two signing steps. All apks as well as the repository index are signed. All of those keys should ideally be stored inside a HSM.

Disclaimer: I asked Nitrokey if they could sponsor some Nitrokey HSMs to get F-Droid’s publishing workflow to work with it. They agreed to send me three of them and asked me to write a blog post about my results.

Step 0: Preparing the Nitrokey HSM2

It’s highly recommended to initialize the Nitrokey with a Device Key Encryption Key (DKEK) before use. This allows key backup and restore onto another Nitrokey initialized with the same DKEK in case of a Hardware failure. It’s also required for importing existing signing keys into the HSM (see below).

A step-by-step guide on how to set this up and the possible options for managing DKEK shares and passphrases can be found here

Needless to say that you should keep the DKEK stored at a very secure place.

(optional) Step 1: Import Existing Singing Keys into the HSM

The Nitrokey HSM2 can only import keys that are “wrapped” (encrypted) with the correct DKEK, so to import a plain key from a java keystore this key has to be manually wrapped with the DKEK first. The manufacturer of the SmartCard inside the Nitrokey HSMs (CardContact) has a tool called smartcard-shell which can do this. The tools isn’t that great to use (it’s a java GUI tool scripted with javascript). I ported this process to a small command-line python tool, which can be found here.

Step 2: Setting up the F-Droid Repo

You should use the latest 2.0a version of F-Droid or install it from git master. A few HSM usage issues have recently been ironed out.

Initialize a new repo as follows, this will setup the necessary config files for using fdroid with a HSM

$ fdroid init --keystore NONE  # NONE means using a HSM keystore

You’ll need to then at least change keystorepass in config.py which needs to be set to the Nitrokeys smartcard pin. If you have imported an existing repository signing key, this needs to be set as repo_keyalias. Otherwise you can create a new key directly on the HSM (change keydname to what the certificate details should look like for you repo.)

$ fdroid update --create-key  # This will take a while...

Step 3: Sign an app and publish an index

From now on everything should work as usual as long as the Nitrokey is plugged into your machine. F-Droid will automatically use it when singing apps with fdroid publish and when generating a signed repository index with fdroid update.

What about signing a lot of apps?

The Nitrokey HSM2 has only limited space for signing keys, it can store up to 38 2048 bit RSA keys. There’s a work-in-progress MR making use of the wrapped key functionality to only load app signing keys onto the HSM on demand. This allows using an unlimited amount of different keys with a single Nitrokey. (Many thanks to Jason Donenfeld (zx2c4) for coming up with this idea!)

by Bubu at October 05, 2020 00:00

October 04, 2020

NewPipe

NewPipe 0.20.0 released: A new major version, a new unified player, a new notification experience... A lot is new this time!

Hey there! Guess who is back? We are. Admittedly, we’re quite a bit late with this release. But there is a very good reason for that. Are you ready for it? Sit down, grab some popcorn and a beverage of your choice. This is going to be long.

A new unified player

“What in the name of the coronavirus is the unified player?” you ask. Well, first of all, that’s a very weird expression. Where did you even get that one from… - you know what? Save it. We don’t want to know. You just keep on using that, we’ll keep on talking about the new player.

A new player it indeed is. Up until now, NewPipe had three different players bundled in its code: the main, pop-up and background players. All three had separate code and separate playing queues. When you switched from one player to another, in the background, the old player and its queue closed itself, while a new player was created, along with a new queue, which took over then. If that sounds complicated and cumbersome, that’s because it is. Moreover, if you accidentally switched using the player buttons below the thumbnail instead of the ones in the drop down menu inside the player, the stream would start from the beginning instead of carrying on from where you left, and you would lose your (possibly carefully built) queue.

Well, no more! The buttons in the player drop down menu have been removed and the action buttons below the thumbnail work like they’re supposed to, so now you’re at no risk whatsoever of losing your playing position or queue. Whew!

This was made possible by rewriting the code so that all players run on one common service. When you switch from one player to another, this service remains running, preserving the stream data, and the new player just picks up from where the old one left off. Everything remains the same, including the queue. Ah, serendipity.

Video details page

A more unified experience is not the only feature this change brought you. There is one which is immediately noticeable once you open a video in the new version: the video details page. Earlier, when you opened the video details, you were shown a thumbnail, video description, comments, etc. Tapping the thumbnail would open the player in full-screen, hiding the rest of these elements. Now, when you’re in portrait mode, the video plays right in the video details page - just like YouTube! There is even a new ‘Autoplay’ setting which plays the video automatically when you open video details - also just like YouTube! This setting will be turned on by default for Wi-Fi. Of course, you can turn it off if you prefer the behaviour of the previous versions.

Video orientation

Previously, the main video player would always play videos in full-screen regardless of your selected orientation. This was fine for landscape videos in landscape mode and portrait videos in portrait mode, but it resulted in a lot of wasted space if the video’s orientation didn’t match the player’s. No more! There is now a full-screen button which replaces the orientation switch button, and it is smart. It will detect if the video is landscape or portrait, and will ensure the player is in the correct orientation when you enter full-screen! How’s that for convenience and usability? Not only that, but if auto-rotate is enabled, and the video is a landscape one, the button will disappear because you don’t need it! (In portrait mode, you still need the button to go into full-screen from the video details.)

Minimized player

You can now swipe down on the video in the video details page to minimize it - just like YouTu… wait no. It’s better. You get a minimized player at the bottom, and you can play/pause or even close it from there. How cool is that? The video will keep playing (or stay paused, if you prefer that) while you browse NewPipe at your leisure! No more having to finish a video before browsing mindlessly! Yay distractions! (In landscape mode, you can swipe down on the title to minimize as well. The swipe area is confined to that region because the rest is used for the existing volume and brightness gestures, as you know.)

Since the player can now be minimized instead of closed, this means you get to retain your opened video queue! Let us go through an example: You watch a video, minimize it, then browse the trending page (you insane person), watch a video from there, quickly minimize it, browse for some calming music, and finally watch a video about pandas. As long as the minimized player isn’t closed (by using the cross button or swiping down on it), you can tap back to go through those videos in reverse order! This allows you to browse a whole bunch of videos and quickly build up a video queue before you start watching them. You were able do this earlier, but you had to use the background or popup player queues as a workaround, since the main player’s queue isn’t accessible outside of the player.

Thumbnail progress bar

You can only see this when you play the video in the background or pop-up, but there is now a shiny new progress bar underneath the thumbnail! It updates in real time, gets a little counter and a red bar - it’s great, really.

All of what you’ve read above was made possible by the lean and mean coding machine, the one and only - (drumroll) - @avently! Seriously, you should all sacrifice your first born child in his name. Or just say thank you, whatever works out for ya (that would be kind of boring, though).


On a serious note, this was a massive, massive change to not only the code, but also the app’s workflow, so this PR was tested, reviewed and modified lots of times, over a long period of time, before it was allowed to see the light of day with this release. A huge thank you to you, @avently, for having the patience and dedication to keep adding features and bug fixes until everyone was satisfied! A different person probably would have gone insane. And a big thank you to the maintainers for doggedly reviewing this gigantic PR repeatedly. Those ~6600 additions and ~5600 removals must have felt intimidating!

Naturally, since this was such a massive change, several bugs also slipped through. But @avently, with the help of @blackbox87, @Stypox and @TobiGr fixed them rapidly as they were reported.

The Notification is dead, long live the Notification!

If you care about such things, you have likely noticed that NewPipe’s notification looks quite different from most media player apps these days. It has a progress bar, buttons in odd places, and a permanent grey colour. This is because NewPipe uses an old API for notifications called RemoteView. This allowed for a lot of customisation, and that was good at the time it was in vogue. However, it has been deprecated and superseded by a more modern API.

Enter the Age of MediaStyle notification:

This is a special notification type which has been available for media apps to use since Android Lollipop. In Oreo, it gained the ability to be coloured to match the colour theme of the cover art of the music playing. And since Android 10, it has a seekbar built right into it! It is a powerful API that removes the need to use a whole bunch of custom code to achieve what we had so far. This will make it far easier to maintain and improve NewPipe’s notification. Win for development! So let’s get on with what is new and what has changed.

Android 9

First of all, we say “sorry” to our users on Android 9 and below. The progress bar is gone. As we’ve said above, it will only be shown on Android 10 and above. We’re a small team and can’t maintain code for the old and new types of notifications simultaneously, so the old one has to go. And not just that; the old notification isn’t even supported Android 11 onwards. Bye-bye RemoteView notifications. We shall miss you! :’(

But you get a lot in exchange for that sacrifice!

New features

You get five CUSTOMISABLE - you read it right! - CUSTOMISABLE action buttons to control playback. There is a new notification category in the app settings, and you can choose which button should perform which player action. Play/pause, forward/rewind, previous/next, shuffle, repeat, close, or even nothing!

Then, you can choose which three of these five buttons show in the compact notification (remember that little arrow you use to expand/contract the notification?).

For users on Android 8+: Colours! Warm colours. Cool colours. All the colours! As we’ve noted above, MediaStyle notifications adapt to the colours of the cover art, which looks just plain awesome.

For users on Android 10+: Seekbar! The old notification had a progress bar, but that was just a visual indicator. Now you can actually seek from the notification itself. Marvel at the massive boost in convenience, and have fun seeking!

For users on Android 11: Congratulations! You get a notification now! NewPipe’s media session will show up in the notification shade and in Quick Settings just as advertised.

This cool contribution was brought to us in its original form by @cool-student. Sadly, we couldn’t get in touch with them when we were ready to focus on this PR, so @wb9688 and @Stypox swooped in to save the day! @wb9688 updated the code to conform to our standards and coding style, and @Stypox did the (painstaking!) work of rebasing the code after the unified player PR was merged into the development branch.

Ultimately, he took over the responsibility for this PR. He updated and polished the UI, fixed bugs, got everyone and their grandfather to test the changes, and pulled us to the finish line!

Improvements

We are not done yet with what this release brings you (you may want to take a few sips of that beverage now). If you use an environment where resizing an app is possible, NewPipe can do this now as well, thanks to @TobiGr.

Have you ever shared a URL to NewPipe, just to be greeted with a little “Unsupported URL” toast? Well, the app still doesn’t support those kinds of URLs with this release, but at least we show you a way better error message now! It allows you to reshare the URL or just offers to open it in a browser instead. All this, thanks to @Stypox and to @webber-naut for bringing our attention to this in the first place.

Talking about sharing, when you share a live stream with someone, NewPipe doesn’t add a timestamp to the URL any more. This was done by @nmurali94. Thanks.

The header layout has been improved: the alignment on the sides is consistent now and longer headings can fit themselves on two lines instead of just one.

If you ever tried to search something and then lost connection to the internet, or just tried to search while being offline, you would have noticed that NewPipe didn’t let you type your search term. Instead it kept on rudely interrupting you with a network error. That is fixed now. You can type all you want, and it will only fail if you actually hit enter or press the search button. Both of these changes were brought to you by @Stypox. Thanks!

In order to save some of that valuable mobile data, you were already able to turn off video thumbnails and profile pictures for comments. Now even the black placeholders which replaced them are gone and comments can comfortably take up the space left behind. Thanks, @4D17Y4!

@TobiGr brought two more improvements into this release: the setting to remember pop-up size and position has a less redundant description, and when you switch to another app, the main player now minimizes to background audio by default to allow for a more seamless transition. Swoosh.

It’s 2020, and our default resolutions also realized this. Instead of having 360p everywhere, main player videos are opened in 720p at 60FPS now, and pop-up ones in 480p. Thank you, @B0pol. NewPipe now also remembers what kind of media you downloaded the last time, and will auto-select it when you hit download on a new video. This was done by @vmazoyer.

Since ‘Autoplay’ is a new configurable setting in this release, @opusforlife2 changed the ‘Autoplay’ toggle in the video details to say “Auto-queue” instead. Now it’s clearer what that toggle does without leaving room for any confusion.

More Translation updates and improvements

Apart from the language improvements mentioned above, some other interesting localization changes happened in this release. @comradekingu, a frequent contributor to and language checker of NewPipe and other open source projects, has once again taken a close look at our strings. There was, as always, a lot of room for improvement. Our wonderful translators rushed to help and immediately implemented his suggestions.

We are also happy to provide new localizations in this release: Sardinian, Bengali, Portuguese (Portugal), Neapolitan and Berber.

If you are missing a translation or think a phrase needs adjustment, head over to Weblate and help us improve NewPipe’s translation even more!

Fixes

If you noticed that next to offline search input now working, the actual text of the suggestions look better now, you are correct. @TobiGr changed the colours used to the default ones.

An empty error report in certain kinds of crashes is not empty anymore, since @Stypox took care of properly calling code. Yay, code! He also fixed a crash when NewPipe encounters an empty comment. Now it will be displayed just as empty as it is.

Thanks to @wb9688, you can open a video in the local playlist tab (and potentially other locations), whereas earlier, the app would crash. And thanks to @BoFFire, if you open the app in the Taqbaylit language, its called Taqbaylit now and not Tamaziɣt Taqbaylit.

The license pop-up doesn’t disappear when you change orientation now. This was introduced by @nmurali94. And @budde92 ensured that you can now delete a file you just downloaded and then try to re-download it without the app crashing. We are not sure why you’d want to do this, but now you can do so without any worries.

@mhmdanas changed a code call because its origin was redundant. Yay for less redundancy. When auto-queue is enabled, Newpipe wants to add a stream to the queue the moment you open a video. But if there are no video suggestions on that page, it causes a crash. This has been fixed by @wb9688.

Development

Development. Where all the magic which keeps this app running happens. It saw some improvements in this release: (Warning: Nerd talk ahead)

  • The extractor will ignore OTF streams now, since they don’t work with progressive HTTP, and the extractor can’t work with DASH just yet. This has been a major point of inconvenience for a lot of users (and us, too!) so we’re eager to mitigate the problem until the proper fix sometime later. (@wb9688)

  • A Checkstyle rule was added so it would show an error when a local variable which could be final wasn’t declared as such. (@XiangRongLin)

  • A library we use, PrettyTime, has been updated to a newer version so that a workaround can be removed from NewPipe’s code. We get a performance improvement as a bonus! (@B0pol)

  • Numbers and uppercase letters are now allowed in the application ID. (@Stypox)

  • Contributors need to discuss their contributions now prior to opening a PR. (@gkeegan)

  • Some deprecations as well as a lot of code cleanup happened. (@TacoTheDank)

  • The code now prevents the YouTube website from accessing the available Java packages from NewPipe’s parser. This removes a possible attack surface. (@wb9688)

Where to get this brand-new version

NewPipe notifies you about new versions. You can download them when you press the notification. An alternative is the GitHub release page. If you use the F-Droid app, it notifies you as well about an update for NewPipe - please keep in mind that it can take F-Droid a while to update their repository. If you have problems installing you may need to uninstall NewPipe then reinstall (make sure to backup data).

If you already had NewPipe installed through F-Droid’s repository, to get this version of NewPipe you can do one of the following:

  • Wait for them to update or
  • Switch to the NewPipe repository by following the directions in the announcement (if you had previously installed NewPipe from GitHub releases you will not have to uninstall NewPipe to switch)

Now that you’ve updated, please let us know what your experience of the latest release is, especially bugs in need of fixing. As usual, you can reach out to us via IRC (#newpipe on freenode), open issues on GitHub or, ideally, use our built-in crash reporter to send us machine-readable issue reports. You can even send in fixes yourself. If you have any other questions feel free to send them in the comments here and someone will reply to you.

October 04, 2020 04:00

October 02, 2020

Purism

Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 3: Transitions

This is part of a series by our guest blogger Tre Scranton covering video creation on the Librem Mini. To read part 2, covering keyframe animations – click here]

In the third and final video of our video series on how to create professional movies with the Librem Mini and KDenLive video editing app, we’re going to focus a bit on effects and how to apply them to your footage for compelling scene transitions.

There are generally three types of video editing FX:

 

Filters – These alter the look and feel of your media, similar to how filters are used on social media platforms like Instagram and Snapchat

Transform – They change the composition of your media, similar to how filters are used on social media platforms like Instagram and Snapchat

Transitions – Presets that control how two videos blend into each other. These bring different scenes and angles together when you need more than a dry cut scene.

There are enough presets and adjustable settings for endless possibilities when making visual content on an open source ecosystem. But don’t take our word for it, check out this commercial for the Librem Mini, made with the Librem Mini.

About the Author

Tre Scranton is an open source advocate, electronic musician, and writer for LBFQ. He likes researching about current practices in the Cybersecurity and Data Analytics fields.

The post Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 3: Transitions appeared first on Purism.

by Tre Scranton at October 02, 2020 19:39

EteSync

Introducing: EteSync Notes

Introducing: EteSync Notes

We are happy to announce the first version of EteSync Notes! 🎉🎉🎉

IMPORTANT: EteSync Notes requires an EteSync 2.0 account.

EteSync Notes is the first new app to use the EteSync 2.0 protocol. As we mentioned in a previous post, a big part of the motivation behind EteSync 2.0 is what it enables for the future of EteSync. EteSync Notes is the first fruit of that effort.

Getting started

EteSync Notes depends on the EteSync 2.0 protocol, as such, it requires an EteSync 2.0 account. EteSync 2.0 is still in beta, though it has been tested by many users over the last month and it's been working very well.

To get an EteSync 2.0 beta account, please refer to the beta announcement post.

Once you've migrated your account to EteSync 2.0 (or signed up for a new one), you can start using the notes app!

You can get it from:

What's next for EteSync Notes

While this is only the first release, it's already quite stable and feature complete (even includes a dark theme!). With that being said, we are aware that some features are missing, and that there may be some issues. So please, report issues as you find them.

There are a few things missing that we are aware of and plan on addressing soon, namely:

  • Labels (tags) for organising the notes.
  • File and image attachments.
  • Improved markdown support (e.g. checkboxes).
  • A rich text editor
  • Improve the look and feel of the web client
  • Show the revision history per note

Please open a ticket if we missed anything important.

A quick tour

EteSync notes uses Markdown for note formatting. Markdown is a rich formatting language that is easy to write by hand (cheatsheet). In the future we will have a nicer rich text editor that lets you editor Markdown files using the GUI, but until then, you can just use Markdown.

Introducing: EteSync NotesExample of a markdown formatted note

Like all EteSync apps, EteSync Notes support securely sharing notes between users. In order to share a note you need to create a new notebook and share that notebook with other users. After you do that, all the notes in that notebook will be encrypted and shared automatically.

Introducing: EteSync NotesAn example of an account with two notebooks

The EteSync Notes app uses the same concepts you are already familiar with from EteSync. This includes a full change history for all of your notes! The change history is not currently visible in the app, but it's all kept behind the scenes.

Thank you NLnet and NGI0

EteSync Notes is based on EteSync 2.0, and the work on EteSync 2.0 is made possible with financial support from NLnet Foundation, courtesy of NGI0 Discovery and the European Commission DG CNECT's Next Generation Internet programme.

The NLnet foundation in general and the NGI0-PET in particular is funding projects to protect everyone's digital privacy, especially in the context of the "next generation" of the internet. It's an extremely important cause which we at EteSync are very much aligned with. Please help by spreading the word about them.


As usual, we would like to remind you that we rely on your feedback and contributions to make EteSync better. Do you have any suggestions or  are experiencing any issues? Please send patches, report issues or just contact us.

Come chat with us on IRC/Matrix, or follow us on Mastodon, Twitter, Facebook, reddit or RSS for the latest updates and privacy-related content!

by Tom Hacohen at October 02, 2020 10:30

Tutanota

The NSA phone surveillance program was illegal and expensive: And it did not stop a single terrorist attack.

Data from the USA and Europe show that mass surveillance does not help to stop terrorist attacks. Yet, the authorities continue to rely on surveillance technology like facial recognition and location tracking. Instead we must focus on our human rights and protect what is important to keep the power with the people: Our right to privacy and freedom of speech.

October 02, 2020 00:00

October 01, 2020

Fairphone

Podcast: Making a business case for African battery recycling

Read more about the business case for African battery recycling in Closing the Loop’s whitepaper based on our learnings from the project.


It’s no secret – We’re out to change the electronics industry. Together with an amazing network of changemakers, we’re disrupting a short-term way of thinking that the world can no longer afford.

These are the folks that inspired this podcast, because all of these projects and initiatives are breaking new ground and the pioneers usually have great stories to tell.  Fairtalks #6 is no different. We’re joined by Joost de Kluijver and Reinhardt Smit, the minds behind Closing The Loop.

 Miquel, Reinhardt and Joost close the loop in our little recording studio.

In short: Together, we’ve delivered a result deemed impossible by many. We turned the most problematic waste stream in tech into commercial, societal and environmental value. The business case for African scrap battery recycling is now proven – and ready to be scaled.

Join our host Miquel, as his two guests take him on a journey towards real, impactful change.

About the project

More than 5,000kg of batteries were collected in Nigeria, before being shipped to Europe for safe recycling earlier in 2020. As part of the pilot scheme, the batteries were safely collected by paying local communities in Nigeria to prevent the batteries from going to landfills.

Since the African continent lacks adequate battery recycling facilities, the project offers major social and environmental benefits in Nigeria. Batteries are often processed under dangerous health and environmental conditions, or dumped and burned in the open air along with other electronics.

CTL’s innovative business model addresses these issues by making it possible to safely collect and ship these batteries from West Africa to Europe. For Fairphone, this shipment is the first step in our long-term plan to use recycled materials such as cobalt, from regions with limited recycling infrastructure, to produce a fairer mobile phone battery. The pilot shows the tech industry that business models to counter e-waste in Africa are possible, and despite the bureaucratic difficulties, collecting and recycling batteries from Africa is achievable and even commercially viable.

The post Podcast: Making a business case for African battery recycling appeared first on Fairphone.

by Jan at October 01, 2020 16:46

Purism

Announcing Librem AweSIM: A Privacy-focused Cellular Service for the Librem 5

Today we are pleased to announce Librem AweSIM: a prepaid, unlimited cellular service designed to work literally out of the box with the Librem 5. Sign up for Librem AweSIM and provide us with your preferred area code, and when your Librem 5 is ready to ship, we will register a new number to your SIM and install it into your Librem 5 so calls, SMS and cellular data just work when you unbox it.

Why Librem AweSIM?

While there are plenty of prepaid cellular plans to choose from out there with a wide range of features and prices, there are two main reasons why we created Librem AweSIM and why we think Librem 5 customers will love it: convenience and privacy.

Convenience

One of the most frequently asked questions we get about the Librem 5 is: will it work with my existing provider? While we have tested the Librem 5 on a number of cellular providers in the US, Canada, and Europe and have published the cellular frequencies our US and EU modems support, even if the Librem 5 supports a network, without testing every provider out there it’s difficult to say in advance whether they will allow a new phone onto their network and if so which features will be supported.

As a precursor to launching Librem AweSIM officially, we set it up for early reviewers of the Librem 5, so when the reviewer turned it on, things just worked out of the box. We knew that kind of convenience and piece of mind is something many of our Librem 5 customers would also like.

We also recognize that not everyone who ordered a Librem 5 will be using it as their primary phone on day one. Some customers will hold on to their previous phone, and test the Librem 5 as their daily driver, and with every software release get closer to it being their daily phone. Having a separate phone number with unlimited service lets you try out all of the features of your Librem 5 on day one.

Librem AweSIM also means having knowledgeable and friendly customer support. Using Librem AweSIM means getting tech support from a team who not only wants to provide you good customer service but also understands what a Librem 5 running PureOS is and how to troubleshoot it.

Privacy

Cellular providers have long subsidized the cost of their service by selling rights for 3rd parties to preinstall apps on your phone that you can’t remove. Yet cellular providers, at least in the US, have started to realize that they have been leaving massive amounts of money on the table compared to other tech companies because they haven’t been fully monetizing their tracking of users and data.

All of the major cellular providers in the US are working to create a “unified customer identifier” using a combination of their customer and billing information along with the unique identifiers that are on their cellphone. According to AT&T’s CEO: “Such technology would allow marketers to identify users across multiple devices and serve them relevant advertising.” AT&T has also announced plans to offer customers a $5 discount on their plan in exchange for allowing AT&T to show them ads on their phone.

These providers are also planning on using this unified customer identifier to create a new authentication scheme called Zenkey they hope websites and apps adopt. While this is in the name of security, the ultimate goal of authentication systems like this (just like with Google and Facebook authentication on 3rd party sites) is to let the provider track you as you move across the Internet.

With Librem AweSIM, we will register your number in Purism’s name, not yours, to provide a degree of separation and privacy between you and the cellular network. While this won’t stop every kind of tracking (providers can still triangulate a particular phone’s location as it connects to cellular towers) it will prevent them from linking that tracking to a specific person.

Simplicity to Start

While we have big plans for the future of Librem AweSIM, we want to keep it simple to start. That’s why we are launching the service with one full-service prepaid plan that offers unlimited talk, text and data for $99/month. This means no need for you (or us) to track minutes, texts, or worry about overages. We are starting the service in the US and will consider expanding into other regions based on demand.

Customers who have already pre-ordered a Librem 5 can sign up for Librem AweSIM and we will contact you to link it to your existing order. Alternatively if you haven’t pre-ordered a Librem 5 yet you can order Librem AweSIM and a Librem 5 together in a bundle. We will charge you for the first month and then pause your subscription until you receive your Librem 5, after which we will activate the subscription and charge you monthly from that point on. You can cancel at any time. Check out our official Librem AweSIM product page for details.

The post Announcing Librem AweSIM: A Privacy-focused Cellular Service for the Librem 5 appeared first on Purism.

by Purism at October 01, 2020 08:01

Purism Launches Librem AweSIM Cellular Service

SAN FRANCISCO, October 1, 2020 — Purism, a Social Purpose Company (SPC) focusing on security and privacy with its hardware and software, has launched Librem AweSIM a $99/mo unlimited privacy-centric cellular service.

Librem AweSIM allows customers to get a pre-paid monthly unlimited cellular plan from Purism that works with the Librem 5 phone. This cellular service plan costs $99 per month and includes a new phone number, unlimited talk, text, and data, and is able to be canceled at any time. Librem AweSIM will be available to customers in the United States to start.

Librem AweSIM will allow a customer to conveniently get a pre-configured Librem 5 phone shipped direct that will have cellular service, phone, data, and SIM card ready-to-go upon powering it on. Customers will also get an additional layer of privacy against targeted tracking by cellular providers since the account is registered under Purism’s name with the backbone provider.

The benefits of subscribing to Librem AweSIM include: monthly unlimited cellular service, a phone number registered and operated under Purism, helps fund additional developmental services offered from Purism, is backed by a Social Purpose Company and movement to build an ethical technological future.

“Librem AweSIM is an awesome way to offer convenience to people who would like to get a Librem 5 that just works out of the box. It also allows for us to fund the change around what mobile virtual network operators should function like.” — Todd Weaver, CEO and Founder of Purism.

Librem AweSIM is available to order today, and will get activated and ship with your Librem 5.

The post Purism Launches Librem AweSIM Cellular Service appeared first on Purism.

by Purism at October 01, 2020 08:00

September 30, 2020

Fairphone

What does it take to launch a fairer phone?

One month ago, we hit a new milestone on our journey towards fairer electronics: the Fairphone 3+. The real stars of the show, though, are the upgraded Fairphone 3 modules that made the “+” possible.

They are real, tangible proof that a better, fairer way is possible for this industry. It shouldn’t be necessary to get rid of your phone just because one part fails, or to buy a new one just to get an upgraded feature. This might sound like common sense, but in practice, this type of modular, repairable design is a groundbreaking innovation.

A lot of practical work had to happen to make these upgraded modules a reality, from sourcing higher quantities of recycled plastics to upgrading camera software. We wanted to make sure the launch of these new, even fairer modules gave them the welcome they deserve. Thanks to you, our Fairphone friends and family, I think we managed to do just that!

Leading up to the launch

At my desk in the Brand team, there was a lot to organize and produce: marketing campaigns, website updates and materials for our retail partners. We knew this was the perfect opportunity to feature YOU, our Fairphone customer; by using a Fairphone you really do change the world. Choosing a fairer smartphone is a first step towards making a positive impact on the fair economy. It means you can keep on texting, calling, snoozing, and living your life, all while standing up for people and the planet.

To bring this vision to life, we organised numerous photo and video shoots (starring our own fabulous Fairphone team) right here in Amsterdam. The notoriously unpredictable Dutch weather was on our side – just look at those beautiful, Fairphone-blue skies!

 

It’s important for us to grow the market for ethical electronics to achieve an even bigger impact. A major part of my team’s work is about growing brand awareness and introducing Fairphone’s philosophy to a wider audience. The launch of the Fairphone 3+ marks the first time we’ve run ads on TV, for example (just in Germany for now!).

The big day: Fairphone 3+ launch event

COVID-19 restrictions weren’t going to prevent us from finding a fun, safe way to share our news with the world. Rather than holding a traditional press conference, our CEO Eva Gouwens virtually welcomed our community directly into our Fairphone HQ in Amsterdam. More than 2,000 people joined the livestream – far more than could have ever attended in person, even before these socially-distant times!

It was really quite exciting to be a part of the event: after the Fairphone leadership team introduced the Fairphone 3+ and the new modules, our community had tons of questions to ask. To see so many people actively participating from all over the world was so inspiring. It shows the widespread interest there is in Fairphone and our mission, and I felt so lucky to be able to experience that – virtually – with all of you.

Fairphone 3+ in the Press

I’m pleased to share that our hard work on this launch is paying off. Lots of media all across Europe highlighted how groundbreaking these new modules are for the electronics industry. And, as a cherry on top, the Fairphone 3+ has been getting good reviews from the (industry) media:

<The Guardian>
<Fr: Le Figaro>
<DE: Süddeutsche Zeitung>

Team work makes the dream work

I am so, so proud of how the Fairphone team came together during these tough times to make this a reality. So many people at Fairphone and external partners played their part to make this an unforgettable launch. Thank you to each and every one of you. Thank you also to our wider Fairphone community, for supporting and believing in us. You are all champions for fairness, and you are awesome!

The post What does it take to launch a fairer phone? appeared first on Fairphone.

by Ewa at September 30, 2020 16:43

Purism

Software Development Progress July and August 2020

This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for July and August 2020 (weeks 27-35).

Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summary is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth between upstream and downstream projects. This quickly gets interesting since we’re upstream for some projects (e.g. calls, phosh, chatty) and downstream for others (e.g Debian, Linux kernel, GNOME). So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab).

New software releases have an extra section so if you’re using phosh, squeekbord, phoc, chatty, etc. outside of PureOS this section might be worth a quick look.

Adaptive Apps

This section features improvements on adaptive apps, GTK, and underlying GTK based widget libraries like libhandy:

Short and instant messaging

Chats (aka Chatty) handles SMS via ModemManager and instant messaging via XMPP. It has experimental support for various other formats via libpurple. Sadiq’s cleanups and bug fixes continued during July and August:

purple-mm-sms plugin

Purple-mm-sms is a libpuruple plugin to handle SMS via ModemManager:

Phone Calls

Calls (the app handling phone calls) saw many translation updates by Yuri Chornoivan, Tim Sabsch, Marc Riera, Scootergrisen, Balázs Meskó, Daniel Șerbănescu and Emin Tufan Çetin but there were improvements on the code side:

Compositor and Shell

This section highlights progress in Librem 5’s GTK based graphical shell named Phosh and its wlroots based compositor Phoc as well as the on-screen keyboard Squeekboard:

Phosh

Phoc

wlroots

Squeekboard

Gnome Control Center (Settings) / GNOME Settings daemon

GTK

Librem5 Base

The librem5-base and the librem5-devkit-tools package contains configuration data and meta-packages that pull in the needed software:

Feedbackd

Feedbackd is responsible for haptic, audio and LED-based feedback:

Linux Kernel

The process of upstreaming our Linux kernel work progress is covered in a separate report. The current one is for Linux 5.7 and the next one will be about 5.9 since there’s not much to report for 5.8. This section mostly about downstream improvements:

flash-kernel

ATF/U-boot

Build Infrastructure

Unsorted upstream fixes

Releases

These were the releases during August and September for projects we’re upstream:

Updates

Updated packages in PureOS to improve things for phone usage:

  • ModemManager got updated to 1.14 along with its companion libqmi which moved to 1.26
  • Plymouth got updated to 0.9.4 for all of PureOS to fix some issues when setting the default theme
  • iio-sensor-proxy got an update to 3.0 to get all the proximity sensor changes we added upstream
  • mesa got updated to 20.1.5 getting us way closer to upstream and picking up many etnaviv related fixes
  • SuperTuxKart 1.2~rc1

Lambda

If you made it down here and want to start contributing join us on matrix. We certainly welcome patches and issue comments on https://source.puri.sm/. If you want to grab an issue and can’t think of a particular problem check the easy and helpwanted tags in our gitlab instance. See you next month.

Discover the Librem 5

Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

Preorder now

The post Software Development Progress July and August 2020 appeared first on Purism.

by Guido Günther at September 30, 2020 15:21

Volla Phone Blog

Reinforcement of the Volla Team

We are looking for employees to strengthen the Volla team: One employee for our customer communication and one freelance software developer who would like to participate in the maintenance and further development of the Volla OS or Ubuntu Touch for the Volla Phone.

by Hallo Welt Systeme UG at September 30, 2020 10:18

September 29, 2020

Purism

Desktop and Phone Convergence

The Librem 5 is more than a phone, it’s a full desktop computer in your pocket designed to be just as mobile as you are.

Stay tuned for more videos where we explore the world of desktop convergence with the Librem 5 using your favorite apps.

Discover the Librem 5

Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

Preorder now

The post Desktop and Phone Convergence appeared first on Purism.

by David Hamner at September 29, 2020 20:31

Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 2: Keyframe Animations

[This is part of a series by our guest blogger Tre Scranton covering video creation on the Librem Mini. To read part 1, covering transposing content over your media and using chroma key – click here]

Last week we introduced you to a premier workflow for film editors and videographers using free software and freedom-respecting hardware – the Librem Mini and a video editing suite called KDenLive. We also dived into the features of KDenLive and how to achieve certain tasks like using chroma key to remove backgrounds and place objects in new environments. In this article we are going to focus on another important video creation task: keyframe animations.

In the video below, we will demonstrate how we achieved a visual in a promo video displaying the workstation power of the Librem Mini, during a transition from a KDenLive screen recording and video footage of a colorful miniature train ride for children on display. Using an image of the minature train captured in a screenshot of the very first frame in the video, I was able to animate the train over the footage of the prior scene to create a captivating custom transition.

Check out our 2nd video covering keyframe animations below:

(Disclaimer): The Librem Mini promo video was edited and rendered entirely with the Librem Mini. The project was then moved to a Librem 15 to screen record our demonstrations on how certain tasks in the promo video was created due to software screen recording limitations through HDMI with VokoScreen.

About the Author

Tre Scranton is an open source advocate, electronic musician, and writer for LBFQ. He likes researching about current practices in the Cybersecurity and Data Analytics fields.

The post Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 2: Keyframe Animations appeared first on Purism.

by Tre Scranton at September 29, 2020 20:19

This Week in F-Droid

Happy 10 Years of F-Droid!

10 years ago today, Ciaran Gultnieks posted the first blog post on f-droid.org 1, kicking off 10 years of bringing free software to Android. From early on, F-Droid also had a strong commitment to privacy and marked Anti-Features to help users choose software that most respects the users. Thanks to the many dozens of contributors over the years, F-Droid now brings free software to millions of users, and is built into many Android ROMs and devices.

In honor of this occasion, there are two new alpha releases:

  • F-Droid (client) v1.10-alpha1
  • fdroidserver v2.0a2

by F-Droid at September 29, 2020 00:00

September 28, 2020

Fairphone

Research spotlight: Studying the end of the tin life cycle

Long before we made a single phone, Fairphone was working to better understand and improve mineral supply chains. Many years and three phones later, we’re still focusing on our mission of driving important materials projects and pioneering research that has a positive impact on how materials are sourced, used and reused – improving both environmental factors and the lives of those working with these materials. One of our focus materials for improvements is tin.

As part of our goal to continually increase transparency and find areas where we can make the most impact, we commissioned two studies which examine this material at two opposite points of the supply chain: virgin tin mining in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and the state of tin recycling in China.

For this study, Fairphone partnered with MacDermid Alpha and Anthesis. The goal of the research was to examine the main hotspots for tin recycling across the entire supply chain. The investigation looked specifically at China, which is the most important hub of electronics production, as well as the world’s largest consumer of tin – accounting for about half of global use.

 

The start of the life cycle: A worker in the DRC pouring refined tin powder.

Over the course of the research, we considered every step of the supply chain where tin waste might be produced, from mining and smelting to electronics production and device recycling. At most of these four stages, the findings revealed that tin waste collection and recovery during the recycling process were far from optimized. At the early points in the supply chain, some of the biggest areas for improvement were related to social or environmental aspects. At the end of the supply chain (electronics recycling), it was clear that recovering tin was not a top priority, in part due to the low prices of virgin tin.

Only 30% of tin comes from recycled sources

The research project concluded by identifying and prioritizing potential interventions. For example, the report recommends aggregating tin recycling (currently spread out between multiple recyclers) to improve the economics of tin recovery. It also recommended further investment in the development of new separation technologies to make it easier to recover more tin from electronic devices, as well as improving recyclability through better product and component design. There is a need for further engagement across the globe of different projects in order to share best practices to improve efficiency in recycling and develop new reliable sources of recycled tin through investment and participation in take-back programs, education in new markets and certification.

Alpha Assembly has been working for years in delivering products containing recycling Tin that adheres to the highest environmental and social standards; we together make a call to the sector to continue demand for recycled tin as a tool for further improving the sustainability of electronics products. Brands/manufacturers should not only source from reliable and trustworthy sources but to make sure their waste also ends in formal channels. In this vision, we need to work together as well to make sure that the informal sector gets continuously formalized to achieve enough recycling tin availability while adhering to the best practices.

Fairphone, Alpha Assembly and Anthesis, hope to be able to shed some light into the difficult ‘business’ of recycling, to show the complexities behind it, but also to launch a call for all stakeholders involved to work on further integration and formalization of the supply of recycled tin.

To learn more about this, please join us in our podcast with Alpha assembly and Anthesis available on our channels >>

The post Research spotlight: Studying the end of the tin life cycle appeared first on Fairphone.

by Miquel at September 28, 2020 15:44

September 25, 2020

Fairphone

A golden opportunity: The risks and rewards of gold recycling

Why would anyone put gold in a phone? Silver and copper are better conductors, and much cheaper. The answer lies in one word: tarnishing. Silver and copper react with oxygen. Pure gold doesn’t, making it ideal for tiny circuits and connectors. What’s not ideal are the deeply ingrained issues that follow gold from mine to factory to recycling.

Gold mining — especially artisanal and small scale mining — poses some serious challenges, both on an environmental and on a human rights level. It has been linked to child labor, armed conflicts, pollution of local ecosystems and considerable greenhouse gas emissions.

 Workers in a gold mine in Busia, Uganda.

A recently published study by the Dutch Gold Sector International RBC Agreement states that the global gold demand is currently met with about 70% mined (virgin) gold and 30% recycled gold. Aside from the ethical and environmental arguments for reducing the use of mined gold in the electronics industry, there’s another simple fact: it’s not an infinite resource. We’re eventually going to run out.

One way of increasing the global supply of recycled gold is to increase the responsible collection and recycling of e-waste. When you  send us your phone for recycling, it’s one of the main materials collected for reuse. But recycling isn’t yet the perfect solution. There are occurrences where recycled gold is linked to criminal activity, money laundering, and the smuggling of e-waste to countries where it can’t actually be recycled. As one effort to address this, we’ve partnered with Closing the Loop, to collect mobile phones and batteries for formal recycling in Europe.

 A smartphone contains about 30mg of gold, 6-9mg of which is found on the printed circuit board (PCB).

The world needs many more reliable sources of recycled gold if we want a fairer electronics industry. Governments, legislators, and regulatory bodies could help: gold recycling guidelines and significant investment in recycling would be great first steps.

We need to simultaneously address the challenges facing the gold mining industry. Fairphone is a member of the gold covenant, an initiative spearheaded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which aims to increase the supply of responsibly sourced gold. Furthermore, Alongside Hivos/Stop Child Labour, UNICEF, Fairtrade Foundation, and Solidaridad, we have established a project in Uganda to fight child labor in gold mines and to set up a sustainable, traceable gold supply chain that creates a better future for miners and their families.

 Partnering with regional government representatives, local officials and opinion leaders is essential for sustainable progress.

We aim for this project to serve as a blueprint for others around the world. We would love to see more phone manufacturers and others in the electronics industry make the same effort we do to invest in and source responsible ASM gold and initiate recycling initiatives.

Want to do your part? Just send us your old smartphones (or Fairphone modules!) for recycling! In a few simple steps, you can be a part of the solution for a fairer future for gold.

The post A golden opportunity: The risks and rewards of gold recycling appeared first on Fairphone.

by Tirza Voss at September 25, 2020 16:48

Tutanota

China's Social Credit System: It's both unique and part of a global trend.

Imagine a world where everyone bins their trash, no one crosses a red light and everyone pays their taxes so that schools are always well funded. This sounds like a nice utopia. But add to this surveillance cameras, face recognition, and the requirement to always praise the government. Now it sounds like an Orwellian nightmare come true: the Chinese Social Credit System.

September 25, 2020 00:00

September 23, 2020

Purism

Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini

[This is part of a series by our guest blogger Tre Scranton covering video creation on the Librem Mini.]

Video content is one of the most popular forms of media for communication on and off the internet. Many creatives spend hundreds, if not thousands – to obtain licensed use to hardware and software as a means to create quality video that can stand on it’s own next to Hollywood-level productions. Fortunately, Purism, a company that respects your digital rights and privacy – has created a free software ecosystem to help restore ownership and control to the hands of the user. With PureOS, you can download KDenLive – an free software video editor – from the PureOS Store and create high-quality video using tools that rival more expensive editors like Adobe Premiere or Final Cut Pro.

The Librem Mini, a small but powerful desktop PC, is perfect for processor intensive tasks like video editing and rendering. Packing an Intel Core i7-8565U (Whiskey Lake) CPU with 4 core and 8 threads with clock speeds at up to 4.9 GHZ and up to 64GB of RAM, it’s capable of being the centerpiece of any film studio. To demonstrate the capabilities of content creation on a Librem Mini, check out the video below:

About the Author

Tre Scranton is an open source advocate, electronic musician, and writer for LBFQ. He likes researching about current practices in the Cybersecurity and Data Analytics fields.

The post Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini appeared first on Purism.

by Tre Scranton at September 23, 2020 23:05

OsmAnd

OsmAnd 3.8 (Android)

OsmAnd 3.8 (Android)

September 23, 2020
(Image not available offline)

For our team a release day, it's like a progress report to the users.

Every day we are working on app improvements to make OsmAnd more user friendly. We fix mistakes, that can also occur due to massive changes that have turned basic maps into a universal tool for travellers for over 10 years.

But still, it is not perfect yet. We are not only grateful for all the positive reviews, but also thankful for the constructive criticism and your dream of a better OsmAnd.

Furthermore, here is a list of the Summer updates:

  • Updated "Plan Route" mode
  • Improved bicycle nodes visibility
  • Context menu for tracks with basic info
  • Added data sources for Online photos
  • Improved "Search" algorithms
  • Improved "Follow track" options in Navigation
  • Fixed issues with import/export of profile settings
  • What else is in this release?
  • Updated "Plan Route" mode

    We renamed the "Measure distance" tool to "Plan a route". The updated "Plan a route" mode allows using different navigation types for each segment and attaches any track to the roads. What does it mean?

    E.g. you want to have a route for your Enduro trip. The first part of your trip is a road from your home to the offroad part, the second part is an unpaved road, and the third part is a road returning home.

    Go to General menu -> Plan a route. Choose "Create new route", next click the Profile icon and choose Road Profile for the first part of our trip. After that, we add starting and ending points. The first segment is built.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    For the second part of our trip, we click the Profile icon and choose our Enduro navigation profile (Prefer unpaved roads) and "Next segment" (Only the next segment will be recalculated using a chosen profile). After that we choose points for our offroad trip.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    For the last part (going back home) we choose Road profile and add the end point of our trip. Click the "Done" button and save (and rename) our GPX file with the journey trip.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Now, we click on our track, then change Appearance of the track. Click the "Directions" button, and start our trip using the GPX track which we built in the "Plan a route" tool.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Next, you can open an existing track, import track, or open the last edited track.

    When you click on "Open existing track" you can select a track file to open.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Now your chosen track is in plan route mode, where you can modify it for your trip. You can click the "Options" button and choose any parameters for it.

    In general, you can build a route between points. Click on this button on the screen or Options menu.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Next, snap your track to the nearest allowed road with one of your navigation profiles to use this option. Here we choose Enduro navigation profile and threshold distance for calculating our route.

    When a route is built we click the "Apply" button and "Done" to save a new track or "Options" -> "Directions" for starting our trip.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Here you see we can modify any track for a trip. Of course, you can delete or add points in "Plan a route" if you want to change your plan on this route.

    Improved bicycle nodes visibility

    Good news for our users with bicycle trips! We improved bicycle nodes' visibility. First, to enable viewing nodes, go to menu -> Configure profile (Cycling, for example) -> Configure map -> Routes. Then, in "Routes", choose "Show node network cycle routes".

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    In this release we improved the context menu for tracks and added an opportunity to display the menu by tapping on a track directly on the map.

    When you tap on the track you can see all infromation about it: points, overwiew, altitude, speed.

    (Image not available offline)

    When you click the "Open Track" button, the track menu opens where you can change apperance of the track, turn on/off the track' display on the map, see graphs (overview, altitude, speed), join segments, split interval and analyse it on the map.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    When you click the "Analyse on map" button, you can see all the necessary information about altitude, speed, slope in each point of your track in graphs and on the map.

    When you click the "Open Track" button, you can see the track menu where you can change the appearance of the track, turn on/off the track' display on the map, see graphs (overview, altitude, speed), join segments, split interval and analyse it on the map.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Added data sources for Online photos

    We added more data sources for Online photos, in addition to the existing Mapillary photos: Wikidata, Wikimedia Commons. When you click a POI or polygon you can find more pictures in Online photos.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    We fixed many bugs in our search algorithms. Now you can find places, points, etc. without any problems.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Improved "Follow track" options in Navigation

    Click Navigation button in General screen -> Option -> Follow track. Here you can choose a track to follow or to import from your device.

    (Image not available offline)

    Fixed issues with import/export of profile settings

    We fixed issues with importing/exporting of profile settings for Custom package and Navigation profiles.

    What else is in this release?

    • Fix bugs with RTL

    _________________________________________________

    OsmAnd at Facebook, Twitter, and Reddit!

    Join us at our groups of Telegram (EN), (IT), (FR), (DE), (RU), (ES).

    Get it on Google PlayGet it on AmazonGet it on App Store

    September 23, 2020 16:00

    /e/ foundation

    Leaving Apple & Google: /e/-FP3+ soon to be available, e Foundation announces financial grant from SIDN Fund & new upgrades and supported devices in /e/OS

    Leaving Apple & Google:

    • /e/-FP3+ soon to be available
    • e Foundation announces financial grant from SIDN fund
    • New upgrades and supported devices in /e/OS

    /e/-FP3+ soon to be available!

    The deGoogled /e/-Fairphone 3+ is the next evolution in privacy conscious and sustainable phones. It supports Android 10 and features 2 new camera modules: a 48MP camera and 16MP selfie camera for higher quality, sharper pictures and videos and is made of 40% recycled plastics.

    If you love to take beautiful pictures and care about fairer technology, this is your perfect companion!
     

    You can already pre-order yours here, it should be available by the end of October.

    e Foundation announces financial grant from SIDN fund

    e Foundation has been chosen to receive a financial grant from SIDN Fund to support the development of an integrated privacy center for Android and improve PWA support in /e/OS.
     
    e Foundation will be developing a “Privacy Center” app to raise user awareness and as well as generally improve their data privacy management. This app will be an integral part of /e/ OS, but will also be available for other Android operating systems.
    It will present information about trackers, permissions as well as privacy leaks and gives users the options to set up alerts, disable app features and set up fake geo-location. The app will be fully open-source!
     
    The other aspect of the project will be to build in support for PWAs in the /e/ app installer as well as fully integrate them within the /e/ OS so that they appear like any other legacy Android application. This technology is a great opportunity to gain more independence from Google & Apple application SDKs and stores, so we’d like to make it as easy as possible for users to install and use them!
     
    Read more about the project here.

    New upgrades and supported devices in /e/OS

    /e/OS now supports new devices such as:
     
    • Samsung Galaxy S5
    • Samsung Galaxy S5 Active
    • OPPO F1
     Also, the Xiaomi Redmi 3s, 3x and 4x are the latest phone models to get an Android upgrade in /e/OS and move to Pie!
     

    All supported devices at https://doc.e.foundation/devices

    How can I contribute and support the /e/ project?

    We are often asked how to contribute to the /e/ project and we are pleased to answer this question because users’ contributions are key to the success of an ambitious project like ours.
    Now is the good time! There has never been so many questions and comments about user’s data privacy, Google, Apple and alternatives to regain control over data privacy… The timing is great and you can contribute in many ways:
    Test /e/OS, report bugs, contribute to patches!
     
    Everyone is welcome to report issues with /e/OS, and possible solutions. Just make sure you can reproduce the problem, post appropriate context information, if possible, some “logs” and ideally… a solution!
     
    Help others! Join the global community!
     
     We have a growing community of users who are discussing their experience with /e/OS. Join now, you will be able to help others answer common or uncommon questions they have about /e/:

    Join discussions, spread the word!

    It’s important to share your experience on our forums, tell us about what you like, your frustrations… It helps us to identify improvements for the product and make it a Premium mobile ecosystem.

    Also, please share the word! Every day, new users discover /e/ and love the project. We need all forces to ensure that as many people as possible learn about the project. We can’t count on mainstream media for this!

    So share with friends and your community channels, talk about /e/ on social media, say why you like it!

    You can also share what we post on Mastodon and Twitter.

    Contribute financially!
     
    With your help, we can support a growing team of passionate contributors, keep /e/ completely independent and make /e/OS sustainable over time.

    Every donation helps the project to pursue additional developments, rent servers for compilation, rent servers to host your e.email account or the community forum, pay for domain names and other key expenses amongst other things.

    If you can afford a recurring donation, become an /e/ Patron!

    Otherwise, choose from the different donations options, and get a reward in return!

     
     

    by admin at September 23, 2020 15:22

    September 22, 2020

    Purism

    Librem 14 Shipping in December

    We set out to build our dream laptop with the Librem 14 and that meant adding new features such as:

    The Librem 14 is going to be a powerhouse with a six core, twelve thread, 4.70Ghz i7-10710U tenth generation Intel CPU. When we first announced the Librem 14 pre-order, we estimated shipping would begin in early Q4 2020 but unfortunately Intel has industry-wide supply issues with the i7-10th gen CPUs which has moved the ship date for the Librem 14 to December 2020.

    That’s the bad news. The good news is that the current $100 pre-order sale will continue for a bit longer. We also hope to finish some fresh Librem 14 prototypes in about a week, so we can share new pictures of the design.

    The post Librem 14 Shipping in December appeared first on Purism.

    by Kyle Rankin at September 22, 2020 19:52

    Making a 3D graphics video for the Librem 5

    At Purism, we do all our videos and other promotional material internally, with Librem hardware and free software only. This is part of our policy and I think it’s important, when I believe in something, to act in accordance with it.

    A few days after releasing the video of the Librem 5 hardware design, I was asked by a few people to publish an article describing the process of making this video.

    In early 2019, we shot a funny commercial for Librem One and I made a blog post, along with a video, to explain the process of making this kind of commercial with Librem hardware and free software. I was not going to do a “behind the scenes” blog post again but the Librem 5 video is entirely made with 3D graphics and the workflow is quite different so I think that it is interesting to describe that process in a new post.

    Making the 3D model

    The goal of this video is to show the design and features of Librem 5 hardware. So, in other words, to disassemble the phone and to show what’s inside it in terms of hardware.

    In order to achieve that in a visually elegant way, I decided to go through a 3D model and do the entire video with computer graphics.

    Modeling the phone and all its electronic components was a long task, that, done in parallel with other projects, took me a few months to complete. I started just after the release of the Chestnut batch and completed it a few weeks before the release of the Dogwood batch that had a slightly different design. The key points being the same between Chestnut and Dogwood, I decided to release the video anyway, without going through the long process of modeling again.

    I used Blender and as I am not a proper 3D modeler, I had to learn while I was advancing the 3D model. Blender and its community are so great, that it is not difficult to find the right information. I learned a lot during this project.

    Animating the model

    Once modeling was done, came the fun part of animating! I love animating because it feels like giving life to something. There is something magical in animations in general.

    To do so, I put the 3D model in its own Blender file, in order to reuse it whenever I need to, and linked it into another file that would hold my animation’s main scene. I am not sure if that is the best approach for this particular animation but it worked for me. From there, I put up a simple scene with a few lights, a touch of color, and I started animating.

    Even though, I divided the video into several scenes in the script, I ended up animating the whole sequence in a single timeline, as a unique sequence shot.

    I ended up rendering the animation as a PNG image sequence with the new EEVEE render engine from Blender, which is very fast on my Librem 13 while producing a pretty realistic output.

    Adding the audio

    Although we do visual art internally at Purism, we don’t do music. Therefore, I had to find an existing track for this project. Finding the right music is always pretty difficult. I know that music tastes are subjective and I usually try to find a track that matches the rhythm and the mood of the video. I also look for music that is released under a free license in order not to be in conflict with the free license of the video itself (all the website’s visual material is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license).

    Thankfully, there are some amazing artists in the world of free art and I ended up using the beautiful track “Sphere” by Creo, which is modern, full of energy and happiness.

    I used Kdenlive to edit the music with the image sequence that I generated from Blender. I didn’t know which music I would use while doing the animation so I had to slightly edit the image sequence for it to nicely match the rhythm of the music track.

    Conclusion

    I love working on this kind of video project. It makes me put my head in my dreams, my creativity, like when I was a kid, but this time with the tools to bring this creativity to life.

    Lately, I have been working on another project that was very special to me. It is a traditional hand made animation, that is not for Purism but that I made with both my Librem 13 and Librem 15 along with two graphics tablets, free software and lots of love. I will come through the details of making this project in a future blog post. Stay tuned!

    The post Making a 3D graphics video for the Librem 5 appeared first on Purism.

    by François Téchené at September 22, 2020 16:07

    September 21, 2020

    OsmAnd

    OsmAnd 3.80 (iOS)

    OsmAnd 3.80 (iOS)

    September 21, 2020
    (Image not available offline)

    Hi!

    We are glad to announce that iOS app version development does not stand still.

    The new improved version is already available to install on you devices!

    Every day we work to make the iOS version more filled and its functionality would be equal to the Android version. Inevitably, we face bugs and mistakes on our way, that we try to fix immediately.

    Thank you for your support and feedback.

    Furthermore in the article, there is a final list of extensions and fixes:

  • Introduced “Application Profiles" with independent settings
  • New arrangement of settings by profiles and types: navigation, general, map and screen
  • Ability to import or export profile settings
  • Added data sources for Online photos
  • Added ability to download online maps to cache
  • Improved "Search" algorithms
  • What else is in this release?
  • Introduced “Application Profiles" with independent settings

    At this release, we added Application Profiles. Now you can create your own profile with independent settings.

    Go to menu -> Settings -> New profile. Here you can change order in profile list, switch on/off profiles.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    New arrangement of settings by profiles and types: navigation, general, map and screen

    Now each profile has its own settings. Go to menu -> Settings -> сhoose profile.

    Each profile has General settings, Navigation settings, Configure map, Configure screen, and Profile appearance menu.

    Of course, you can set Plugins for the selected profile.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    Ability to import or export profile settings

    You can export your profile or import other profiles.

    To import a profile, tap on the needed file (*.osf) in any application and select "Copy to OsmAnd Maps".

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    To export a profile, go to menu -> Settings -> Choose profile -> Export profile.

    (Image not available offline)

    Added data sources for Online photos

    We added more data sources for Online photos except mapillary-photos: wikidata, wikimedia commons. When you click to POI or polygon you find more pictures in Online photos.

    (Image not available offline)

    Added ability to download online maps to cache

    Now you can download online maps to cash.

    At first, you should change online maps in 'Map type' menu. Next, long click to the map -> Actions -> Download map. Here, you can choose map area, map type, max/min zoom, you see the number of tiles and download size. When you set all parameters for downloading to click 'Download'.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    We fixed many bugs in our search algorithms. Now you can find places, points and etc. without any problems.

    (Image not available offline)(Image not available offline)

    What else is in this release?

    • Fixed crash while starting navigation

    • Fixed bug with OpenStreetMap Editing Plugin

    • Fixed an issue with "Nautical maps" always stuck in update state

    And remember that only together we can achieve the best results!

    New features are coming SOON!

    ____________________________

    OsmAnd at Facebook, Twitter, and Reddit!

    Join us at our groups of Telegram (EN), (IT), (FR), (DE), (RU), (UA), (ES).

    Get it on App Store

    September 21, 2020 16:00

    /e/ foundation

    e Foundation kondigt financiële subsidie van SIDN fonds aan

    e Foundation kondigt financiële subsidie van SIDN fonds aan

    SIDN Fonds zal de ontwikkeling van een Privacy Central app voor Android ondersteunen, dat wordt opgenomen in /e/OS. Het project zal plaatsvinden over de komende twee jaar en heeft als doel om gebruikers te helpen hun persoonlijke gegevens op hun smartphones beter te beschermen.

    21 September, 2020

    We zijn erg blij te kunnen aankondigen dat SIDN Fonds de e Foundation heeft gekozen voor een subsidie van 75.000 euro, voor de ontwikkeling van een ‘Privacy Central’ app voor Android.

    SIDN Fonds is een onafhankelijke stichting die is opgericht door SIDN, de stichting voor internetdomeinregistratie in Nederland. Sinds 2014 heeft dit fonds meer dan 250 innovatieve projecten ondersteund die bijdragen aan een sterker, beter en veiliger internet voor iedereen.
    e Foundation is dankbaar dat het panel van SIDN fonds vindt dat ons project deze principes ondersteunt.

    /e/OS biedt als eerste een volledig ‘deGoogled’ mobiel besturingssysteem voor mobiele telefoons. Echter, het moment dat gebruikers een app installeren om een ritje te boeken, een restaurant te reserveren of te chatten met vrienden en familie, kunnen ze onbewust hun persoonlijke gegevens opnieuw in gevaar brengen. De meeste apps bevatten trackers, software die de activiteit van gebruikers controleert, hun locatie vastlegt of zelfs toegang heeft tot de documenten op de telefoon zonder dat gebruikers dat weten. Dit is waar onze Privacy Central app in het spel zal komen.
     
    Het project

    e Foundation zal een ‘Privacy Central’ app ontwikkelen om het bewustzijn van Android gebruikers over privacy op hun mobiele telefoon te vergroten. De app zal gebruikers ook meer controle geven over de trackers op hun smartphones en in hen het algemeen betere mogelijkheden voor het managen van privacy op hun telefoon geven.
    Deze app zal een integraal onderdeel zijn van /e/ OS, maar zal ook beschikbaar zijn voor andere Android-besturingssystemen. Het doel hiervan is om zo veel mogelijk gebruikers te helpen zich meer bewust te worden van de privacyproblemen op hun telefoon.
    De app zal gebruikers één centraal punt bieden om een gedetailleerde analyse van de privacy op hun telefoon te bekijken en waar nodig actie te ondernemen.
    De app zal een overzicht geven van trackers, rechten en privacy-lekken en zal gebruikers de mogelijkheid bieden om hun privacy te verbeteren door het instellen van waarschuwingen, het uitschakelen van bepaalde app-functies en het instellen van valse geo-locatie. De app zal volledig open-source zijn; dit betekent dat de code voor iedereen beschikbaar zal zijn.

    Maar het project gaat meer doen en heeft ook nog een tweede onderdeel: de ontwikkeling en integratie van Progressive Web App (PWA) technologie-ondersteuning in /e/OS. PWA’s zijn een geweldige kans om meer onafhankelijkheid te bewerkstelligen van de Google & Apple applicatie winkels, dus we willen het zo makkelijk mogelijk maken voor gebruikers om ze te installeren en te gebruiken.
    PWA’s hebben belangrijke privacyvoordelen: ze draaien in de ‘sandbox’ van een browser en hebben daardoor minder toegang tot gebruikersgegevens. Ze hebben ook minder achtergrondactiviteiten, waardoor het voor apps moeilijker is om gegevens over gebruikers te verzamelen en te versturen.

    Daarom willen we ondersteuning voor PWA’s goed inbouwen in de /e/ app store en deze volledig integreren in /e/ OS, zodat ze eruit zien als elke andere legacy Android applicatie. Dit zal een echte innovatie zijn, waarmee /e/ het eerste OS en de /e/ app store de eerste app store doe dit doen.
     
    Volgende stappen

    Als onderdeel van dit project gaat /e/ zorgen dat Nederlandse organisaties die gespecialiseerd zijn in Android, mobile OS en privacy, alsmede Nederlandse IT-onderwijsinstellingen, de kans krijgen om mee te denken in het project.

    Met de steun van SIDN Fonds is het project nu gestart en we zijn nu bezig om ontwikkelaars en privacy-experts te werven om aan het project te werken. De leiding van het project ligt bij Gaël Duval, /e/’s oprichter, en Rik Viergever, een maatschappelijk ondernemer uit Nederland en /e/-gebruiker en -enthousiasteling sinds hij in 2019 kennis heeft gemaakt met het project.

    De eerste stap in het project wordt een enquête over privacy op mobiele telefoons, om input van gebruikers te krijgen over wat zij belangrijk vinden met betrekking hiertoe. Mensen kunnen op deze pagina meedenken over de vragen die we moeten stellen in deze enquête https://community.e.foundation/t/input-gezocht-voor-enquete-over-privacy-als-onderdeel-van-samenwerking-met-sidn-fonds/21185.
    De enquête komt zowel in het Engels als in het Nederlands beschikbaar.
    De resultaten van de enquête gaan /e/ helpen om de Privacy Central app en PWA-ondersteuning zo te ontwikkelen, dat deze in overeenstemming zijn met wat gebruikers van mobiele telefoons in Nederland naar op zoek zijn op het gebied van privacy.
    Tot slot, wanneer de ontwikkeling compleet is, zal er in Nederland een lanceringsevenement plaatsvinden, waarbij e Foundation-oprichter Gaël Duval een presentatie zal geven over /e/ en dit project in het bijzonder. De details van dit evenement worden t.z.t. bepaald.

    Over SIDN Fonds

    SIDN Fonds staat voor ‘een sterk internet voor iedereen’. Het fonds geeft financiële steun aan ideeën en projecten die gericht zijn op het versterken van het internet, het versterken van de positie van internetgebruikers of het gebruik van het internet op een innovatieve manier. Daarmee wil SIDN Fonds het gebruik van internet in Nederland maatschappelijker maken.

    Bezoek de website op: https://www.sidnfonds.nl  

    Bekijk de projectpagina op: https://www.sidnfonds.nl/projecten/privacy-central-app-en-pwa-support-in-e-app-store-en-os

    Voor aanvullende informatie kunt u contact opnemen met: info@sidnfonds.nl

    Over /e/

    /e/OS bouwt mobiele besturingssystemen met meegeïnstalleerd apps en online diensten die gebruikers helpen de controle over hun persoonlijke gegevens op hun telefoon terug te krijgen. Het OS is opgericht door Gaël Duval.
    /e/OS zet zich in voor een betere bescherming van de privacy en de veiligheid van gegevens voor individuen en bedrijven, samen met een state-of-the-art, gebruiksvriendelijke ervaring.
    /e/OS is een mondiaal project, ondersteund door een internationaal kernteam van ervaren ondernemers, ontwikkelaars en ontwerpers, en een levendige groeiende gemeenschap van gebruikers en vrijwilligers. Het is de missie van /e/ om technologie te creëren die goede privacy voor iedereen toegankelijk maakt.

    Bezoek de website https://e.foundation

    Volg ons op social media voor verdere updates:
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/e_mydata   
    Mastodon https://mastodon.social/@e_mydata   
    LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/eelo.io

    Voor aanvullende informatie en verzoeken om interviews kunt u contact opnemen met:
    Brittny Mendoza op media@e.email

    by admin at September 21, 2020 14:35

    e Foundation announces financial grant from SIDN Fund

    e Foundation announces financial grant from SIDN Fund

    SIDN Fund will support the development of an integrated privacy center for Android™ that will be included in /e/OS. The project will span over the next two years and aims to help users gain better control of their personal data on their smartphones.

    September 21st, 2020

    We are very pleased to announce that SIDN Fund has chosen e Foundation as a recipient for a 75 000 euros grant for an engineering project.

    SIDN Fund is an independent foundation established by SIDN, the foundation for internet domain registration in the Netherlands. Since 2014, this fund has supported over 250  innovative projects that help build a stronger, better and safer Internet for all.
    e Foundation is grateful that the SIDN Fund panel feels that our project is in alignment with such principles.

    /e/OS delivers on its promise of a clean, privacy first, and fully deGoogled mobile Operating System on your phone, but the minute you install an app to hail a ride, book a restaurant or chat with your friends and family, you might unknowingly be compromising your personal data all over again. Most apps include trackers, software that monitors your activity, captures your location or even accesses the documents on your phone without you knowing.
    This is where our Privacy Center application will come into play.

    The project

    e Foundation will be developing a “Privacy Center” app to raise user awareness and gain more control on trackers on their smartphones, as well as generally improve their data privacy management.
    This app will be an integral part of /e/ OS, but will also be available for other Android operating systems, to help as many users as possible become more aware of privacy problems on their phones.  
    It will provide users with one centralized point to get detailed analysis of privacy on their phone and take action if necessary.
    It will present information about trackers, permissions as well as privacy leaks and gives users the options to improve their privacy by setting up alerts, disabling app features and setting up fake geo-location. The app will be fully open-source, with the code available to all.

    The other aspect of the project will be the development and integration of Progressive Web App (PWA) technology into the /e/OS mobile OS. This technology is a great opportunity to gain more independence from Google & Apple application SDKs and stores, so we’d like to make it as easy as possible for users to install and use them.
    PWA have real privacy advantages: they run in the ‘sandbox’ of a browser and therefore have less access to user data. They also have fewer background activities, making it more difficult for apps to collect and send data about users.
    To this end we aim to build in support for PWAs in the /e/ app installer as well as fully integrate them within the /e/ OS so that they appear like any other legacy Android application. This will be a true innovation, making /e/ the first OS and the /e/ app installer the first to do so.

    Next steps

    One aspect of our collaboration with SIDN Fund is our plan to make sure that Dutch organizations specialized in Android and mobile OS, as well as Dutch IT educational institutes will be given the opportunity to contribute their expertise to the development of the project.

    With the support of SIDN Fund, the project is now underway and we are currently recruiting engineers and privacy experts to support us in implementing it. It will be managed by Gaël Duval, /e/’s founder, and Rik Viergever, a social entrepreneur and /e/-user and enthusiast since he learned about the project in 2019.

    Our first step will be to set up a survey about privacy on mobile phones, to get users’ input on what they find important in this regard. People can add their suggestions for what we should focus on in this survey here: https://community.e.foundation/t/input-on-survey-about-privacy-as-part-of-collaboration-with-sidn-fund/21186.
    The survey will be held in both English and Dutch.
    The results of this survey will help us develop our Privacy Central app and PWA support that is in alignment with mobile phone users’ expectations.
    In addition, a launch event will take place in the Netherlands, with e Foundation founder, Gaël Duval giving a presentation about /e/ and this project specifically. Details are still to be determined.

    About SIDN Fund

    SIDN Fund stands for ‘a strong internet for all’. The fund provides financial support to ideas and projects that aim to make the internet stronger, empower internet users or that use the internet in innovative ways. By doing so, SIDN Fund wants to help increase the social impact of the internet in the Netherlands.

    Visit the website at https://www.sidnfonds.nl/excerpt

    View the project page at https://www.sidnfonds.nl/projecten/privacy-central-app-en-pwa-support-in-e-app-store-en-os
    For additional information please contact: info@sidnfonds.nl

    About /e/

    Founded by Gaël Duval, /e/OS builds mobile operating systems with pre-installed apps and online services that help users regain control of their personal data on their phones. /e/OS is committed to providing better data privacy and security for individuals and corporations,
    along with a state-of-the-art user-friendly experience.
    /e/OS is a global project, supported by an international core team of experienced entrepreneurs, developers and designers, and a vibrant growing community of contributors.
    Its mission is to create technology that makes user privacy accessible to everyone.

    Visit the website at https://e.foundation.

    Follow us on social media for further updates.
    Twitter https://twitter.com/e_mydata
    Mastodon https://mastodon.social/@e_mydata
    LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/eelo.io/

    For additional information and interview requests, please contact:
    Brittny Mendoza at media@e.email

    by admin at September 21, 2020 14:01

    September 18, 2020

    Fairphone

    Meet the changemakers: Fairphone Ambassador Raphaël Masvigner

    We’re on a journey to change the electronics industry – and we’re not alone. While the Fairphone is a physical expression of the possibility of change, it also happens to be a great storytelling device that connects us with inspiring changemakers from all over the world.

    In this series, we’re shining a light on our ambassadors: a group of bright individuals that share our vision of a fairer future and contribute to sustainable change in their own way. Today, we’d like to introduce you to Circul’R co-founder Raphaël Masvigner.

     


    Who is Raphael Masvinger?

    My name is Raphaël and I’m 32. I’m a French entrepreneur passionate about the environment. After traveling for 17 months through 22 countries to meet with 150 circular economy entrepreneurs, I co-founded Circul’R with my friend, Jules. Today, Circul’R is building bridges between companies and more than 600 circular entrepreneurs to accelerate the transition towards a sustainable economy.

    So this was how you first heard about Fairphone?

    I discovered Fairphone four years ago during my world tour to discover circular economy solutions. The Netherlands was one of our first destinations and we had the chance to meet the Fairphone team, as well as other inspiring circular companies such as Patagonia and Mud Jeans. After learning more about Fairphone, we continually presented the company in our conferences as a model to follow regarding its commitment to circular economy values.

    This world tour was quite the undertaking! What sparked your interest in sustainability and circularity in the first place?

    I guess the turning point came when I was 16 years old. I watched Al Gore’s movie “An Inconvenient Truth” for the first time. I realised we were facing major environmental issues and we were not taking concrete actions to tackle the problem. Right after that, I decided to be part of the solution by dedicating time to learn more about environmental issues and what could be done to solve them.

    I’m passionate about the ocean and surfing. Surfing made me aware of plastic pollution in the ocean. While surfing you definitely notice the increasing amount of waste in our seas. Every second, 300Kg of plastic ends up in the ocean. At this pace, there will be more plastic than fish by 2050. The good news is that a growing number of people and entrepreneurs are taking concrete actions to avoid such a situation. The Surfrider Foundation launched an app called Ocean Zero that is a great help to take small action everyday, highly recommended!

    It’s a sobering thought for sure. Is there any specific thing that really drives you forward in your life and work?
    I cannot live without three things: family, friends and nature.

    Those are the most important for me too! Do you have any tips on sustainable living for our community?

    I like this quote: “Happiness is wanting what you already have.” My tip would be to be satisfied with what we have, and challenge yourself to move towards a zero waste lifestyle. Share your tips with others, keep on being curious, and don’t be too hard on yourself while implementing this new lifestyle!

    I’ll try to immediately take your advice on being curious; I’m sure you’ve met amazing people and had incredible experiences during your travels. Can you share some of your favorite memories shot on your Fairphone 3?

     

    Mumbai, India, January 2020

    This is one of my favorite photos. Last December, I took a train with 400 aspiring Indian social entrepreneurs. We traveled for two weeks all around India to meet role models that have created solutions to tackle climate and social issues in the country. This project is called Jagriti Yatra. Here is the team I shared my amazing journey with (from left to right): Sadai, myself, Hemanth, Shoven, Nimesh and Powen.

     

     

    Talloires, Les Alpes, France, June 2020

    A special moment with my friend on the mountain, waiting for a delicious tartiflette and some good wine.

     

     

    La Saladita, Guerrero, Mexico, August 2020

    La Saladita, a far from everything. The perfect spot to practice surfing where you will meet turtles, small sharks and dolphins. Pure happiness!

    Thank you for sharing! What is it like having your Fairphone 3 alongside you during these kinds of experiences?

    Fairphone is a great tool to start a conversation about sustainability and circularity. Whether you are at work, having a coffee, or traveling, use your Fairphone as an ice breaker to exchange ideas about this topic with people you don’t know. It will surprise you how well it works!

    Having those kinds of conversations can be a really effective way to share Fairphone’s mission. Do Fairphone and the Fairphone 3 also have a direct impact on your work?

    At Circul’R, we do many conferences to raise awareness about the solutions to transition toward a circular economy. To convince people, we need to present concrete projects. Fairphone is a great and inspiring example as it is a product we use daily. With it, people easily understand the importance of eco-design and circularity. They can also become circularity ambassadors by having a Fairphone or sharing its story and purpose with their friends.

    Thank you for your time, Raphael, and for your commitment to a fairer future!


    Check out Circul’R’s website and their LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook.

    For more on Raphael, Circul’R, and our other Fairphone Ambassadors, stay tuned to this blog or head on over to our community page.

    The post Meet the changemakers: Fairphone Ambassador Raphaël Masvigner appeared first on Fairphone.

    by Lora at September 18, 2020 16:37

    September 17, 2020

    Pine 64

    PSA: Vulnerability Disclosure 2020/09/17

    PINE64 (both the business and the community around it) prides itself on transparency. Often, this transparency is used to give you a behind the scenes look into our operations. But today, we’re afraid we must be transparent about something else. As of approximately 4:30am GMT on 2020/09/17, we discovered an intrusion to our Pine Store web instance. This took on the form of spam/

    Source

    by Lukasz Erecinski at September 17, 2020 22:59

    Purism

    Adventures of porting postmarketOS to the Librem 5

    Guest post by Clayton Craft

    I’ve been longing to drop the shackles of Android ever since I made the decision to stop using my Nokia N900. Nokia had given up on Linux phones, and it was clear that there would be no further security patches for my favorite smartphone of all time. Shaking Google out of Android had been my mission for years, and I had resorted to running my own builds of “de-Googled” LineageOS. I was longing for something better. I was out of the country when I first read about postmarketOS (“pmOS”) in May 2017. postmarketOS is a Linux distribution based on Alpine Linux, that strives to provide a Linux distribution running the mainline Linux kernel, as a means to revive old smartphones long forgotten by their manufacturers. My beloved N900 was one device with (rough) support! I quickly jumped on eBay to order a second N900 to meet me at home when I arrived back, because obviously two are needed. Obviously… Thus began my relationship with postmarketOS, one that continues to this day.

    Things were not all rosy though… After some time it became clear that the older N900 CPU wasn’t going to get any faster for running “modern” applications and that there would never be a free userspace graphics driver for its GPU, so I was quite excited when I first learned about the Librem 5. Sure, it didn’t have a physical slide-out keyboard, but the promise of a device from a company that would treat Linux support as a first-class citizen was too good to pass up. I promptly pre-ordered a developer kit (“devkit”) and phone, with the full intention of porting postmarketOS to the device and eventually using it full time to replace the heaping pile of Android in my pocket.

    Some assembly required

    Photo showing the Librem 5 devkit

    The devkit couldn’t have arrived at a better time (sarcasm); right before the holiday season! After spending the first few days still in the box due to my “other obligations,” it was rapidly de-boxed and I started planning my next move. Some cursory research told me that the devkit used an SoC from NXP, used the bootloader u-boot, and was flashed with a utility called uuu. Since I wasn’t completely sure how uuu worked, and expected trouble once I started to experiment with using it to flash pmOS, the first task was to solder on headers for using the UART.

    This, as I suspected, proved to be a very worthwhile step. Purism should consider just adding the header next time, though it was very simple to DIY at any rate. The only other modification I made to the devkit (completed a few days later) was adding an external 40mm fan right over the SoC’s heatsink. It wasn’t necessary, but I did cause the device to reboot at least once compiling Mesa, so I figured it couldn’t hurt. A photo of this fan (shown later on) ended up causing some angst on the Internet. Oops. After adding a battery, per Purism’s recommendation, I was now ready to get some work done!

    “Don’t reinvent the wheel, just realign it” (Anthony J. D’Angelo)

    Being new to using NXP (and Emcraft) devices, a large part of the first day was spent trying to gather as much information as possible about how this device boots, how to push images to it for booting, where in the image it expects a bootloader (u-boot) to be “installed,” and the required format and locations for the kernel and device tree file. Emcraft had a surprising amount of information on their website, along with some examples in the form of out-of-tree kernel patches and pre-compiled binaries. By far the greatest breakthrough was discovering Purism’s Jenkins CI instance. Being familiar with picking apart Jenkins output because of $daily_job, I was able to figure out how Purism was building all the major components. By searching Purism’s Gitlab instance for the script names run in CI, I could locate the appropriate repositories and source code for those scripts to use as a model for the Alpine Linux packages I’d have to create for supporting the devkit and phone in pmOS.

    Armed with a basic idea of what I’d need to make an attempt at booting a custom u-boot and kernel, I started looking in-depth at uuu. This was a completely new tool to me, but it was very easy to package for pmOS/Alpine Linux. The uuu utility can be passed a script with arbitrary commands to execute, and once again, Purism’s prior work on this provided me with a helpful template to use later on when I had created a pmOS image for flashing to the device. I was able to use the u-boot image from Purism’s devkit artifacts to verify that my packaged uuu worked

    The next step was to look at building/packaging the u-boot, the Arm Trusted Firmware (ATF), and the Cortex M4 firmware for DDR training. These were generally fairly straightforward to create an Alpine Linux package for, though, since none of these components used upstream/mainline source, the packages had to diverge from any that may already exist in Alpine Linux (e.g., can’t use their u-boot) in order to use the sources with any patches from Purism/Emcraft/NXP/etc. The biggest hurdle here was that the M4 firmware needed to be a 32-bit ARM binary, while everything else was compiled for AArch64. The package repository specific to pmOS (pmaports) includes cross compilers, so I was able to compile/assemble the single image bootloader into one Alpine Linux package. Not exactly ideal, and would almost certainly be rejected by upstream Alpine, but it was quick/easy, and simple to debug. Purism’s CI and supporting scripts were heavily utilized in order to figure out the right sequence of steps to build things, where to “install” resulting binaries, and how to generate a correct image with them all included.

    Getting to the point of having a working u-boot/firmware image required some trial and error, some of which was no fault but my own, and having that UART header on the devkit was absolutely required for me to resolve all of those early, pre-Linux kernel boot issues.

    Anatomy of a mobile device in postmarketOS

    Devices in postmarketOS are supported by device-specific Alpine Linux packages that are responsible for installing any additional configuration unique to the device, and providing parameters to the tool (pmbootstrap) responsible for building pmOS images for flashing to the device. Common components of a device package in pmOS include things like configuration files for setting up audio, and parameters for specifying where to “install” u-boot in the image that is generated. pmbootstrap makes it very easy to create a skeleton device package, by just specifying the new device when running pmbootstrap init. The hard part is collecting all of the various configuration files that help enable and set up hardware for the device. Once again, Purism’s public repositories to the rescue! By grepping my way around their public repos (e.g.,librem5-base), most functionality on the Librem5 present in PureOS could be enabled in pmOS early on. Most devices in pmOS, unfortunately, require downstream kernels. The devkit and phone (as of today) are no exception, though it is close enough to mainline that I didn’t have to apply any of the various hacks that pmOS includes for dealing with ancient, abandoned downstream kernels. As a result, it was relatively straightforward to create an Alpine Linux package for building/installing Purism’s kernel fork. The last major piece was graphics. I could have ignored this if I only wanted to boot to a console using the framebuffer, but that’s no way to use a smartphone in 2020! (/troll)

    I wanted to run Plasma Mobile and Phosh, and the only way I could do that was with a version of Mesa that supported the GPU on the devkit. At the time, support for this GPU was upstream in Mesa, but it had lots of issues. If I wanted to have a decent chance of running a hardware accelerated graphical environment, I would have to package Purism’s Mesa fork. This would end up creating all sorts of issues later with package dependency resolution in Alpine Linux (conflicts with Alpine’s Mesa package and subpackages were frequent), so thankfully this was only temporary until Purism landed all of their patches in upstream Mesa.

    Going the extra mile

    I now had everything needed to generate my first bootable postmarketOS image for the devkit, and flash it to the device!

    Except I didn’t. Flashing the device manually with uuu was fine for me, but I expected anyone with a Librem 5 to be able to easily use pmbootstrap to build and flash pmOS to the device. The first change was teaching pmbootstrap to automate uuu. pmbootstrap has had support for flashing devices directly with external tools for quite some time. Most devices originally shipped with Android using fastboot for flashing, which isn’t an option for the Librem 5. Having image flashing support isn’t a requirement, but it’s much nicer than trying to use scary tools like dd to destroy flash disks, or requiring folks to run some other command/script separate from pmbootstrap to get pmOS on their device. Shoehorning uuu automation into pmbootstrap was basically just adding some new pmbootstrap configuration parameters to the device package that can be used to tell pmbootstrap to use uuu, and then patching pmbootstrap to call uuu with the right parameters when instructed to flash the image to the device.

    The Librem 5 devkit (and phone) require two firmware files for booting, as mentioned previously: u-boot and M4 firmware. pmbootstrap knows how to deal with embedding u-boot firmware (used by some devices supported in pmOS), but did not know how to embed two separate firmware into the flashable pmOS image. Another patch adding this functionality, and some more device package config parameters were all it took. Now I was ready for…

    First boot!

    Photo showing first boot of postmarketOS on the Librem 5 devkit

    At the time, the devkit’s onboard display was not functional, so I had to make do with HDMI to an external display which, fortunately, worked perfectly. XFCE is a fairly lightweight desktop environment with (most) Batteries Included by default, so it’s a favorite of mine for the first boot of pmOS on a device.

    Plasma Mobile largely worked out of the box too, though I did get some help from KDE developer Bhushan Shah. Nothing says success like a dark, slightly blurry photo taken at 1:49am.

    Photo showing Plasma Mobile on the Librem 5 Birch

    A lot of folks in the Purism Matrix channels are excited about “device convergence,” in particular using your phone with an external keyboard/mouse/monitor as you would a desktop PC. Not to be the one left out, I thought it might be fun to play Elder Scrolls 3: Morrowind (via OpenMW), which basically requires a keyboard/mouse to use. After packaging OpenMW in Alpine Linux, I was now able to play one of the best RPGs ever made on the devkit. Albeit, not at a super smooth frame rate, but that was to be expected given how early this hardware was and the current state of its support in Mesa.

    A Linux distribution meets a Linux phone

    Photo showing first boot of postmarketOS on the Librem 5 phone

    Fast forward a few weeks, and Purism is starting to ship their first phones to the general public. I deferred receiving the phone I ordered until the “Evergreen” batch, because I wanted a higher quality device to use for years. I was bummed that I was stuck using a devkit with pmOS, and was starting to regret my decision when Purism was kind enough to lend me a Birch phone to play with. No time was wasted deleting the PureOS image on it (sorry Purism!) to make room for pmOS. Luckily the same SoC was chosen for the phone, so only minor changes were needed to the device package in postmarketOS since the phone shared the same kernel and u-boot source code as the devkit. The u-boot configuration was different, but that was just a matter of selecting the appropriate defconfig at compile time.

    UARTs UARTs everywhere, but not enough to use

    One thing that was worrisome from the start was the lack of readily accessible UART on the phone for debugging issues pre-Linux boot. Now, this wasn’t something most users of the phone would care about, but I had relied on this extensively on the devkit to find the right combination of configuration parameters for booting pmOS. The schematics for the phone show there are 4 UARTs, but none of them have headers pre-installed, and 2 of them are available in the super tiny test point pads under the back cover. A few devices that we’ve used with postmarketOS support serial console out via a 3.5mm headphone jack. That would have been a nice feature for the Librem 5, but wishing for it wouldn’t help my current situation.

    Eric Kuzmenko from Purism pointed me to an M.2 debug breakout board that apparently Purism was using in-house at one point, and provided me with a version of the layout that exposed only UART. I had this board fabbed, but still (as of today) have not succeeded in getting u-boot to output a serial console over it. So, if there are pre-Linux u-boot-related issues, I’ve had to fall back to using the devkit to debug them. Luckily I haven’t yet had any pre-Linux boot issues specific to the phone.

    It’s worth noting that this is largely a problem for me and anyone else who wants to port an OS to run on this device. The vast, vast majority of users won’t miss having easy UART serial console access.

    Fortunately for my first attempt at booting on the phone, the only issue I ran into was accidentally using the u-boot image built for the devkit. Oops. And, fortunately, that didn’t result in any magic smoke being released!

    If it looks like a phone and acts like a phone, it must be a phone

    Photo showing SMS on a Librem 5 phone running postmarketOS
    It wasn’t long after this that Purism was demonstrating the modem work they had enabled in their PureOS distribution. Enabling the phone’s modem with ModemManager was easy, but audio was not being routed correctly during a phone call. Purism released a small application called wys that handles audio routing during phone calls, so after packaging this application for Alpine Linux (so it was then available in pmOS), I was able to make and receive phone calls to some degree. Audio quality and proximity sensor support still needed a little work, but the makings of this being an actual phone were already there. SMS just worked on pmOS with no changes at all, which was a very pleasant surprise after having spent a lot of time in the past figuring out how to send and receive an SMS using ofono test scripts on the N900. Mobile data connections also just worked in pmOS with Phosh and ModemManager; another very pleasant surprise!
    Photo showing postmarketOS running on a Librem 5 Dogwood

    So…what now?

    postmarketOS on the Librem 5 is off to a great start but there’s still much more work to be done (both upstream in PureOS and postmarketOS) before I’m comfortable depending on the Librem 5 full time to replace my current mobile phone. For those interested in playing along, the current status of postmarketOS support on the Librem 5 can be seen on this Gitlab milestone, and you can drop by our IRC/Matrix channels here.

    While there’s always room for improvement, working with the Librem 5 devkit/phone and Purism has been super refreshing. I would not have been able to move as quickly to port postmarketOS to the Librem 5 without the tremendous amount of help from Purism; both implicit by way of public repos and CI, and explicit from Purism employees responding to my queries. Many devices booting postmarketOS are largely ignored or forgotten by the manufacturers that made them, and use some super old downstream kernel originally meant to run with Android, so the effort to get pmOS working on them is a much larger hill to climb. I welcome this new age of devices with first class Linux support!

    Discover the Librem 5

    Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

    Preorder now

    The post Adventures of porting postmarketOS to the Librem 5 appeared first on Purism.

    by Purism at September 17, 2020 16:52

    Tutanota

    DDoS attack on our DNS infrastructure

    Last night multiple DNS providers were attacked to take down Tutanota. In combination with wrongly cached DNS entries for the tutanota.com domain at different DNS servers, this led to a downtime of several hours for millions of Tutanota users. We had switched DNS entries, but as the propagation takes time, some users did not get access to Tutanota immediately.

    September 17, 2020 00:00

    September 16, 2020

    Purism

    Anbox on the Librem 5

    Anbox now runs on the Librem 5, getting you access to many additional free software apps that are packaged only for Android. We are also working on streamlining the install process. Soon you’ll just need to:

    • Install Anbox
    • Put android.img into /var/lib/anbox/
    • Reboot

    In addition to simplifying the install process, while testing Anbox we also identified and fixed a few bugs such as how maximized X11 applications (such as Anbox) displayed on the Librem 5.

    xwayland auto-maximization test.

    With Android emulation unlocked on the Librem 5, the number of usable mobile apps has once again jumped. It’s time to start thinking about which apps you have to keep for now, and which apps could use the ad-free respectful PureOS touch.

    Discover the Librem 5

    Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

    Preorder now

    The post Anbox on the Librem 5 appeared first on Purism.

    by David Hamner at September 16, 2020 17:58

    Tourists on Tech’s Toll Roads

    When I read Shira Ovide’s piece “Apple Watch Is a Private Road” in the New York Times, I was reminded of my honeymoon in Cancun. Like many people who honeymoon in Cancun, we stayed at an all-inclusive resort along the ocean. In addition to enjoying the resort, we also rented a car so we could visit some of the surrounding areas, in particular the famous Mayan ruin Chichen Itza.

    When we set off to visit Chichen Itza, the map featured a main route via a toll road and an indirect route that winded through the jungle and passed through a number of villages. I didn’t want to get lost, so I opted for the direct route through the toll road. The road was wide, freshly paved, no stop signs, and almost entirely empty–it was a smooth trip with the only stop being the toll booth we hit when we got on the road.

    I had assumed the toll would be $1 or so–everything else up to that point had been relatively affordable in Cancun–but was shocked when I slowed down and discovered the toll was $10! This was about three times what the Golden Gate Bridge charged back then! I felt taken advantage of, yet once we got to the toll booth, there was no easy way to turn around or avoid it, so we just paid the fee and I blamed myself for being a dumb tourist who should have researched things better.

    We spent the day in Chichen Itza and on the way back I vowed I would not be taken advantage of again. This time we would take the indirect, free route through the jungle. I was so glad I made that choice as I passed through one village after another and saw local people living their lives. While it wasn’t as fast or smooth a road as the toll road, I felt like less of a tourist on a curated tour of someone else’s property and more like I was seeing what “real” Cancun was like.

    This was before GPS navigation was common so I carefully followed the paper map and wooden road signs as I moved from one village to another, always ensuring I would avoid the toll road. As I followed the signs to the final road that would take me to the resort, I found myself back on the toll road! I was infuriated but I realized I was so close to the resort, perhaps the toll booth was already behind me. It didn’t matter in any case because now that I was on this private road there was no way to get off. Sure enough, a mile later there was the toll booth. With no way to turn around and no way to get off the private road, I had no choice but to pay another $10 to get back to my room.

    All Signs Point to Private Roads

    The crux of Ovide’s article is that diversity and openness in computing has brought us many tech advances, but today so many of tech’s most recent advancements are closed and tightly controlled by the vendor:

    Think about the last quarter-century of computers and the internet like a highway. The companies that made gadgets and software systems controlled the roads, and cars made by other companies drove (with some restrictions) on those roads. Computer devices would be meh if we couldn’t have access to a diversity of apps, websites and software — and vice versa.

    But newer technologies for interacting online — smart watches like the Apple Watch, voice activated speakers, internet-connected televisions and robot-piloted cars — mostly pull us into digital features the device maker creates or tightly controls. They are more like private roads than the open highways of the smartphone and PC eras.

    Ovide is right to point out that the recent trend is toward systems that are increasingly more closed. Unfortunately it’s only the latest in an ongoing cycle throughout the history of computing between open highways and private roads. Each swing in the pendulum moves from public, open, shared innovation that lays the open roads to private companies who use those public roads to build their for-profit toll roads. Those companies fight to ensure that no matter what signs you follow, you end up on their private road.

    A Brief History of Open Computing

    You can find many examples of this pendulum swing in the history of computing. Open software development in the late 1960s and early 1970s led to closed development on proprietary UNIX operating systems by the late 1970s. This spawned the GNU project to forward the goals of Free Software along with the advent of free BSD UNIX operating system variants. UNIX systems were among the first nodes on the Internet as it was being created with open protocols and standards in a collaborate academic environment. Because of this, even though Microsoft would come to dominate the home PC market in the 1990s, it didn’t share the same dominance on the server side, so when Windows PCs finally connected to the Internet, they had to do so with open protocols like DNS and TCP/IP instead of Microsoft’s proprietary NetBIOS protocol. Eventually even local Microsoft-dominated networks began to speak the open protocols of the Internet.

    As more PCs got on the Internet in the late 1990s, many Internet Service Providers (ISPs) such as AOL fought to gain private control over this public network in the form of private roads to the Internet called “portals”–a custom web browser that provided a curated view of the Internet along with proprietary chat clients and games. Customers could chat and play games with each other as long as they used the same ISP. Fortunately outside of these ISPs, email and other web protocols were open, so you could use alternative ISPs and see a complete, unfiltered view of the web and use open protocols to chat and game with whomever you chose regardless of what ISP they used.

    This open Internet accelerated collaboration on free software as well, resulting in the full set of GNU tools that led to the Linux kernel and the Apache web server, among other prominent free software applications. This spawned a new golden era of open software development and collaboration throughout the early aughts that laid the foundation of free software libraries and utilities that a majority of our web frameworks and cloud software is based on today. Many startups used these open libraries as a jumping off point for their own tools (even Google used Jabber/XMPP technology in initial versions of Google chat applications) .

    As the aughts progressed, because the new tech giants were making their money by selling user data, the focus shifted back into creating portals. This time Google and Facebook were the dominant players and set out to ensure that you saw the rest of the web curated through their websites and chatted with your friends using their proprietary services. This “portalization” got worse as people shifted to using smartphones as their primary computers so that most apps became in essence a closed, mini-portal into the wider Internet you’d otherwise access from an open web browser. Now you have five different incompatible apps on your phone you use to chat with different people. Big tech companies can’t even manage to be compatible with themselves: Facebook alone owns three different incompatible chat apps–Google owns six!

    Private Roads Paved With Bad Intentions

    Smartphones provided tech companies with a blank slate to re-imagine how they approached software. The iPhone in particular rewrote the rules for how tightly a vendor can control a platform. While Apple has always held tight control over their platforms, in the past it didn’t get as much notice since they were a minority player compared to Microsoft’s dominance of the home PC market. Even with Apple’s tight control over MacOS, third parties could still write an application for a Mac without Apple’s permission and Apple customers could install and run it outside of Apple’s control.

    The iPhone changed all of this. From the beginning, a developer must have Apple’s approval before a customer is allowed to use their application. To reinforce this control, Apple has advanced their security restrictions on the phone itself so that with each generation of iPhone and iOS, “jailbreaking” or “rooting” the phone so that you can run the software of your choice becomes more and more challenging. With the recent versions of the phone this is reinforced by custom, proprietary hardware and strong cryptography. Even hardware accessories for the iPhone require Apple’s approval or else you will get a warning that the device is not certified. These measures are always marketed as being for security from hackers and more recently also in the name of privacy, but from the beginning it has always been about ensuring that Apple can control which applications and accessories are allowed on the iPhone, in particular when those applications compete with their own offerings.

    Seeing Apple’s success, competitors followed their lead so that now Android employs many of the same restrictions (again in the name of security and privacy) so that they can control the software that runs on Android devices. In the case of Android, this also ensures that cellphone vendors can not only pre-install their own vendor software that customers can’t remove, they have also made a side business out of selling software placement on their phones to third parties who often use the access to harvest customer data.

    As Ovide’s article states, this closed approach has defined the next generation of computers (smart watches, smart speakers, smart TVs) already. There’s no attempt by these vendors to build open platforms when they design new technology. It’s rare when these platforms play well with each other. Will your smart watch work with your smart phone? Can you control your smart TV with your smart speaker? The only way to ensure technology is compatible is to buy it all from the same vendor. That’s by design.

    Traditional computers are on the same path. Google has already extended this same approach–in the name of security–to Chromebooks to ensure that the only applications allowed on their laptops are those Google explicitly approves. Apple is moving quickly to extend these same security measures to their laptops as well. The goal of each of these vendors is to have no open highways, only private toll roads, leading only to their tourist attractions.

    Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need (Private) Roads

    Think about the future of computers over the next fifty years. Computers will become even more ubiquitous, not just embedded in all of the things around us, but embedded inside us. With advances in neural-computer interfaces, there is a high likelihood that we will be connecting computers directly to our brains within our lifetimes. Which tech company would you trust to control your neural implant?

    If a computer can read and write directly to your brain, does it change how you feel about vendors controlling which software you can use or whether you can see the code? Does it change how you feel about vendors subsidizing hardware and software with ads or selling data they access through your computer? Does it change how you feel about government regulation of technology?

    One promise of neural technology is to supplement humans with apps that provide instant skills and knowledge. Imagine Apple and an app company get in a dispute, Apple removes the apps from that company from their neural implant OS, and you lose the ability to speak Mandarin, drive, cook, play guitar, or write software?

    We can’t accept being a tourist on tech’s toll road, the future demands open highways accessible by everyone, where you can freely go where you want, how you want. Now is the time to disrupt these closed platforms locked to and controlled by a single vendor. Openness and diversity are advantages, not weaknesses, and the future demands more openness, more collaboration, and more freedom and control given to individuals over their own computers.

    The solution is to invest in technologies and companies that are building the open highways we need for the future. With Librem computers and the Librem 5 phone running PureOS, we are working to build platforms founded on free software and open standards that put users back in control. Help us build the future we all want to see.

     

    The post Tourists on Tech’s Toll Roads appeared first on Purism.

    by Kyle Rankin at September 16, 2020 00:08

    Tutanota

    We must ban facial recognition to defend privacy.

    Facial recognition lets companies and authorities track and find people based on big data. This comes with lots of threats, not just to individuals. It is also a severe threat to basic human rights like privacy or freedom of speech. And, as a consequence, face recognition is also a threat to democracy itself. Facial recognition comes with so many problems that we must ban it now.

    September 16, 2020 00:00

    September 15, 2020

    Pine 64

    September Update: Let it sink in…

    We have been fortunate to welcome many new members into our ranks over the past 30 days. This is in large part due to the continued interest in the Pinebook Pro and PineTab, which have just shipped, as well as the ongoing massive demand for the PinePhone. By my estimate, come December we will have shipped more PinePhones than OpenMoko and the original Ubuntu Touch smartphones … combined.

    Source

    by Lukasz Erecinski at September 15, 2020 15:41

    Purism

    GPS Tuning the Librem 5 Hardware

    Phone Hardware debugging in a duopoly

    Society is getting pretty used to the idea that the data and applications on phones are completely controlled by large corporations.

    Purism is working hard to change that with the Librem 5.

    Because of the market capitalization and duopoly control of the phone OS vendors, the hardware tool vendors use are trapped into one of those two OSes (Android or iOS).

    GPS debugging as a case example

    We’ve been working on antenna tuning in the Librem 5 for awhile to get the best possible reception. The GPS antennas are especially important because their signal level is so close to the noise floor.

    The available GPS antenna tuning procedure is a GPS simulator, but the simulator requires feedback from the phone OS to help tune the antenna. If you are on Android the simulator vendor provides an apk that converts the NMEA to a format that the tools can use to do the tuning.

    So now we have a tool to do the tuning but no way to use it.

    Option 1 get anbox running

    So I did seriously consider trying to use anbox to get the apk running on the Librem 5. I didn’t think this would be workable for a couple of reasons.

    1. The GNSS chip doesn’t use a /dev/ttyS0 device but a /dev/gnss0 so I had no idea how well Android or anbox would deal with that.
    2. There are a lot of moving parts to get anbox running smoothly enough for productive development and my todo list is already pretty lengthy.

    Option 2 RE the apk

    So the next thing I figured I’d reverse engineer the apk so that I could provide the feedback tool. I didn’t have a lot of faith that this would work as reverse engineering a protocol can be very time-consuming.

    Loading up the apk on an Android device the first thing it asks for is an IP and port. Ok, this might be workable. I whipped up a little python program to try and capture the apk output.

    #!/usr/bin/python
    
    import socket
    
    UDP_IP = "192.168.0.2"
    UDP_PORT = 8080
    
    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
    
    sock.bind((UDP_IP, UDP_PORT))
    
    while True:
        data, addr = sock.recvfrom(1024)
            print("received message: %s" % data)
    

    Immediately I started receiving GPS location and satellite S/N ratio numbers. Perfect so now I just need to figure out what each of the fields meant.

    Writing a GPS test tool

    I began by capturing all of the JSON strings output by gpsd and trying to fit them into the correct fields for the GTS 1800 test tool. Almost immediately I started hitting some kind of mismatch between the gpsd output and the json libraries installed on the phone. I’m not sufficiently pythonic to understand what the issue was.

    Ok, I really don’t need that additional abstraction that gpsd provides so I installed the python-nmea2 library and started working directly with the NMEA strings. In short order, I had a script that would take the NMEA and convert it into something I thought the GTS 1800 could digest. I’d guessed at a couple of the fields but I hoped it was close enough to start the GPS antenna tuning.

    Unfortunately, it wasn’t until a few screens captures from the antenna testing engineer running a Windows tool that I was able to refine the test tool to a point that the GTS 1800 would accept the strings. The biggest problem was that I guessed wrong about the first field which turned out to be a message length. Ooops, should have figured that one.

    Once I reformatted the fields the GTS tool would accept the strings but it still wasn’t running the tuning algorithm so there was still some kind of error in the fields. This is when the test tool vendor figured out what I was trying to accomplish and sent me a protocol specification. Better late than never. So 2 more minor fixes and we now have a tool that can be used on any box that runs python to tune GPS antennas.

    So duopolies aren’t just bad for software, they aren’t any good for hardware development either.

    Discover the Librem 5

    Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

    Preorder now

    The post GPS Tuning the Librem 5 Hardware appeared first on Purism.

    by Angus Ainslie at September 15, 2020 08:25

    September 14, 2020

    Tutanota

    Update on the continuous DDoS attack on Tutanota.

    This weekend continuous DDoS attacks and an infrastructure issue led to downtimes for hundreds of users. While we were able to mitigate most of the DDoS, an overreacting IP-block to fight the attacks led to hundreds of users not being able to access Tutanota for multiple hours this Sunday. We deeply apologize for this mistake; it has now been fixed. Here we want to quickly explain why we have to build the DDoS mitigation ourselves, how the progress is so far, and what you can expect as next steps. Thank you very much for supporting our fight against the attackers and for our right to privacy!

    September 14, 2020 00:00

    September 11, 2020

    Purism

    Your Phone Is Your Castle

    A Brief History Lesson

    There is a saying “A man’s home is his castle” that derives from an even older British saying “an Englishman’s home is his castle” from hundreds of years before. Putting aside the history of male and female ownership of property for the past few hundred years, this statement came about as a matter of common law in the 17th century that enforced the right that no one–even the King–may enter a British person’s home without their invitation. As stated famously by Prime Minister William Pitt in 1763:

    “The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the crown. It may be frail – its roof may shake – the wind may blow through it – the storm may enter – the rain may enter – but the King of England cannot enter.”

    This right influenced the United States founding fathers and became a right against unreasonable search and seizure enshrined in the fourth amendment in the US Bill of Rights.

    Ultimately this statement is one about personal sovereignty over your property: that you should be able to control what happens with your property, should be able to control who is allowed to enter it, and should be allowed to defend it from intrusion.

    Your Phone Is Your Castle

    If your home is your physical castle, your phone is your digital castle. More than any other computer, your phone has become the most personal of personal computers and holds the most sensitive digital property a person has, including:

    • Detailed contact lists of friends and colleagues
    • The contents of private communications
    • Personal photos (sometimes including very intimate ones)
    • Personal files (sometimes including financial documents)
    • Health and biometric information (sometimes including personal heart rate, blood pressure and exercise regiment)
    • Passwords to online accounts
    • Often even a database (if not multiple databases) of everywhere the phone has (and therefore you have) been.

    So to extend the metaphor, if your phone is your digital castle, it means you should be able to control what happens with it, who is allowed to enter it, and should be allowed to defend it from intrusion.

    Well, Maybe Not Your Phone

    The unfortunate fact is, for most of the people reading this article, your phone is not your castle. In many ways, your phone isn’t yours at all, at least if we are using these same traditional definitions of property. Instead, you happen to live in a castle owned by your phone’s vendor. It’s Apple or Google, not you, who decides what is allowed to enter the castle, and what happens inside its walls. They are the ones who are allowed to defend it from intrusion, and more importantly they are the ones who define what counts as intrusion to begin with. Your phone is their castle, you just happen to live inside their walls subject to their rules.

    The recent epic battle between Apple and Epic over the tariff Apple charges for merchants to sell goods inside the castle walls illustrates how Apple markets their castle’s defenses as protecting the castle residents when in reality it’s about controlling all that goes on inside the castle.

    If you haven’t been following the case, Epic is objecting to the 30% cut of their revenue that Apple gets from processing payments within the App Store. Epic has added an alternate payment processor within their popular game Fortnite that competes with Apple’s App Store payment processor by charging a lower price for purchases made through the game since Epic avoids Apple’s 30% processing fee. Apple has responded by threatening to remove Epic’s software from the App Store as well as revoking their ability to use Apple’s development infrastructure.

    A customer can only install apps that are in the App Store, so by removing Epic’s app from the App Store, Apple removes them from the full iOS ecosystem. Customers who own iPhones and who have paid for and installed Fortnite would then have the application removed from their phones. In a court filing, Apple argues that the requirement that customers may only install software through the App Store is needed “for security and privacy.”

    There is some truth to this statement. Because iOS software, backed by iPhone hardware, actively prevents a customer from installing any software on an iPhone outside of the App Store, it does also prevent attackers from installing malicious software. Because the App Store has rules about how applications (outside of their own) can access customer data, if Apple discovers a competitor like Google or Facebook is violating its privacy rules it can remotely remove their software from iPhones, even internal corporate versions of software owned by Google or Facebook employees.

    In all of these examples, though, the “security and privacy” of customers happens to also coincide with restricting a competitor. While Apple markets themselves as welcoming competition on the App Store, Apple has a long history of resisting competition with their own products from the App Store such as when it banned parental control apps around the same time it released its own, only to remove the ban a few months later after its own app had sufficient market share.

    I should note that Apple isn’t the only company that does this, it’s just that their control is a bit more advanced than Google’s. In my Consent Matters series I elaborate on a number of different companies that take remote control of customer computers including the now-famous example where Google was forced by the US Government to remove Huawei’s ability to update Android on their own hardware. Huawei has since responded by building their own OS so they have control over their own castle (and subjects).

    Well, Maybe Not Their Castle

    If you live inside a strong, secure fortification where someone else writes the rules, decides who can enter, can force anyone to leave, decides what things you’re allowed to have, and can take things away if they decide it’s contraband, are you living in a castle or a prison? There is a reason that bypassing phone security so you can install your own software is called jailbreaking.

    These companies have built very sophisticated and secure defenses all in the name of protecting you from the world outside their walls, yet in reality the walls are designed to keep you inside much more than they are designed to keep attackers out. The security community often gets so excited about the sophistication of these defenses backed by secure enclaves and strong cryptography that their singular focus on what those defenses mean for attackers blinds them from thinking about what they mean for everyone else.

    The biggest threat to most people ends up not being from uninvited hackers, it’s from the apps Apple and Google do invite in that capture and sell your data. This has resulted in a multi-billion-dollar app ecosystem built around capturing and selling your data. If Apple or Google let someone in you didn’t invite, whether through pre-installed applications or new features embedded in an OS update, you can’t tell them to leave. Your security and privacy aren’t really protected inside these walls because the main point of these security measures is to enforce control, security against attackers and protecting your privacy is mostly marketing spin.

    Make Your Phone Your Castle

    It doesn’t have to be this way. We believe your phone should be your castle and that you should be in control of your own computer, not us and not any other vendor. This doesn’t mean sacrificing security or privacy, on the contrary it means putting your security and privacy in your own hands by building a strong foundation of trustworthy free software anyone can audit, while rejecting security measures that build a stronger cage around you than attackers. It means controlling your hardware with hardware kill switches so you can disable your camera and microphone, your WiFi and Bluetooth, and even your cellular modem and all of the sensors on your phone and know they are truly off.

    You should decide which software is allowed on your system, not Purism. While other vendors often are paid to bundle third-party applications you aren’t allowed to remove, all of the software on the Librem 5 including pre-installed software is fully under your control. There’s no “rooting” or “jailbreaking” required to install or remove the software of your choice or even to install a different OS. While we will provide you with a list of trusted, curated free software in our PureOS Store, if you want to invite some other software into your home, even software that violates Purism’s Social Purpose, you can.

    The current phone market is centered on vendor control and is only getting worse with each iteration and advancement. We had to design and build the Librem 5 from scratch, because no other combination of hardware and software on the market met our high standards for freedom, security, privacy, and user control. What we have built with the Librem 5 is a phone that works the way your most personal of personal computers should work–your own digital castle where you can store your most sensitive digital property, control what happens with it, and decide who’s invited in.

    Discover the Librem 5

    Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

    Preorder now

    The post Your Phone Is Your Castle appeared first on Purism.

    by Kyle Rankin at September 11, 2020 21:48

    September 10, 2020

    EteSync

    EteSync 2.0: Ready for Testers

    EteSync 2.0: Ready for Testers

    We are happy to announce that EteSync 2.0 is now ready for testers! Are you interested in helping us with testing? Please read on! Not sure what is EteSync 2.0? Please read our previous post on the topic.

    Introduction

    We have been working on EteSync 2.0 for the last six months, though in a sense for a lot longer. It incorporates a lot of the feedback we got from you over the years, and the things we have learned in the three and a half years of running this service. As mentioned in our previous post, a lot of the changes are behind the scenes and will enable us to build on top of, though there are a few changes that are worth mentioning here again as they are important for testers.

    1. EteSync 2.0 uses usernames for identification (rather than emails previously), so you will need to choose a new username. Usernames should be at least 6 characters long. Shorter usernames will probably be allowed in the future. Changing your email and username will both be possible later on.
    2. EteSync 2.0 has just one password that's used for both the encryption, and the login. It uses a zero-knowledge proof to authenticate to the server making sure your password never leaves your device. Please make sure to keep it safe and don't lose it, as without it you won't be able to access your data!
    3. The change log (previously change journal) used to show all of the changes in one long list. Changes are now grouped per item with only the latest changed shown. To show previous changes you need to click on an item and check the past revisions.
    4. Invitations UI is a bit different, and there's now a special page for accepting or rejecting invitations, and it's now also easier to leave collections you've been invited for.
    5. "Journal" has now been renamed to "Collection", which is a more accurate term and people find it less confusing.

    In addition to the above, we also improved the clients while working on them. Especially the web UI which should now be faster and easier to use than ever. There may also be some other changes we forgot to mention.

    How to start testing

    As mentioned above, EteSync 2.0 uses usernames instead of emails and has a different authentication mechanism. This means that EteSync 2.0 accounts are internally new accounts that need to be created.

    If you are new to EteSync and would like to give it a go, you can signup directly from the new web and Android clients (links below).

    If you already use EteSync 1.0, there is a migration tool that automatically handles both the account creation and migrating your data over (including the full change history). It's currently only available for the web client, but will soon also be available for the Android and iOS clients.

    There are migration tools available for migrating your account. The easiest is probably the web based migration tool which is available here: EteSync 2.0 migration tool. The Android app comes with its own migration tool. You can access it by clicking on the account you would like to migrate, then the top-right menu, and then "EteSync 2.0 Migration".

    The migration tool only copies your data over, so if you change your mind, you can always go back to version 1.0. Just be aware that new changes made to 2.0 won't sync back to 1.0 and vice-versa, so you will have to copy them over manually if you change back to 1.0.

    To make testing easier, billing is currently disabled for EteSync 2.0 accounts, they are all on infinite trials. We will however turn billing on for all EteSync 2.0 accounts in the next few weeks, and will automatically link your existing EteSync accounts to the EteSync 2.0 accounts using your email address so billing information will be transferred over automatically. Edit: billing is now turned on for EteSync 2.0.

    Here are links for the EteSync 2.0 compatible apps:

    • Android: available on the Play Store and F-Droid.
    • Web
    • EteSync-DAV (DAV Bridge) - Version 0.30.0 or newer
    • iOS: available on the App Store
    • GNOME (Evolution): coming soon
    • KDE (Kontact and etc): coming soon
    • External apps:
      • OpenTasks: works.
      • Tasks.org: works with the new OpenTasks-like integration.

    What is there to test? Everything. A few of us already use EteSync 2.0 instead of EteSync 1.0 and it works very well, however we realise that there may be some bugs lying around. So please, report every issue you see. You can do it either in the respective bug trackers, by mail, or our chat (see links at the bottom of the post).

    We are aware that not all of the strings have been updated (e.g. some dialogs still refer to 1.0 journals), and on Android we still haven't implemented restoring an item to a specific state or sending email invitations, and the signup flow needs some more work, but other than that, everything should work. So please, report every issue you encounter.

    If you are self-hosting, the server is available here, though it doesn't yet have all of the easy-config stuff that EteSync 1.0 had that made self-hosting easier. We will port them over in the coming weeks.

    What's coming soon

    As said in the original post, EteSync 2.0 brings with it a lot of improvements, but in addition to the improvements to the existing EteSync apps, where it really shines is what it enables us to do next.

    We aren't ready to get into details just yet, but we plan on bringing in some long-awaited features such as notes synchronization and secure location sharing. These, however, are just the tip of the iceberg. We have a lot more coming, so expect a few more announcements in the coming month or two which will make EteSync a more complete solution for your data syncing needs!

    As for the EteSync 2.0 release itself, we don't have an exact date yet, but it's imminent. There are no major bugs that we are aware of, and everything seems to be working well. We would just like to have more people test it, so we can be extra sure that everything works as smoothly as it should.

    Developers: using the EteSync protocol in your app

    Over the years many developers have reached out to us about adding end-to-end encryption to their applications. Building end-to-end encrypted applications is both hard to get right, and very time consuming, so using an existing solution makes a lot of sense, especially since EteSync is versatile and isn't limited to contacts, calendars and tasks.

    We are now also ready for developers. For more information, please take a look at the developer homepage (Etebase).

    Thank you NLnet and NGI0

    The work on EteSync 2.0 is made possible with financial support from NLnet Foundation, courtesy of NGI0 Discovery and the European Commission DG CNECT's Next Generation Internet programme.

    The NLnet foundation in general and the NGI0-PET in particular is funding projects to protect everyone's digital privacy, especially in the context of the "next generation" of the internet. It's an extremely important cause which we at EteSync are very much aligned with. Please help by spreading the word about them.


    As usual, we would like to remind you that we rely on your feedback and contributions to make EteSync better. Do you have any suggestions or  are experiencing any issues? Please send patches, report issues or just contact us.

    Come chat with us on IRC/Matrix, or follow us on Mastodon, Twitter, Facebook, reddit or RSS for the latest updates and privacy-related content!

    by Tom Hacohen at September 10, 2020 11:49

    /e/ foundation

    Leaving Apple & Google: /e/OS Easy Installer is now available on Windows, new smartphone models are now supported by /e/OS

    Leaving Apple & Google:

    • /e/OS Easy Installer is now available on Windows!
    • Several new smartphone models are now supported by /e/OS

    Note: for technical reasons, we are not able to publish this newsletter to the web this week, so it won’t be available in other languages. Sorry for the inconvenience!

    /e/OS Easy Installer is now available on Windows!

    After Linux, the /e/OS Easy Installer is now available for Windows! Getting /e/OS on your device is easier than ever!
    Read our documentation for more information by following this link.

    Several new smartphone models now support /e/OS

    /e/OS now supports several more phone models:
    • Asus Zenfone 3
    • Asus Zenfone Max Pro M1
    • Asus Zenfone Max Pro M2
    • OPPO R5 and R5s
    • OPPO R7 Plus and R7s
    Also, the Honor 5X and LeEco Le 2 are the latest phone models to get an Android upgrade in /e/OS and move to Pie!
    All supported devices at https://doc.e.foundation/devices/

    Vote for new applications at ecloud.global!

    ecloud.global is your private cloud based on NextCloud, OnlyOffice, Postfix, … where you can retrieve the pictures and videos you took with your /e/ smartphone, use your @e.email webmail service, edit office documents online and more…
    We will soon add new applications to the cloud, but we want to listen to your needs first!

    Get your /e/OS smartphone now!

    Now is the time to purchase an /e/OS smartphone: prices have dropped on several models!

    How can I contribute and support the /e/ project?

    We are often asked how to contribute to the /e/ project and we are pleased to answer this question because users’ contributions are key to the success of an ambitious project like ours.

    Now is the good time! There has never been so many questions and comments about user’s data privacy, Google, Apple and alternatives to regain control over data privacy… The timing is great and you can contribute in many ways:

    Test /e/OS, report bugs, contribute to patches!
     
    Anyone is really welcome to report issues with /e/OS, and possible solutions. Just make sure you can reproduce the problem, post appropriate context information, possibly some “logs”, and ideally… a solution 🙂
     
    Help others! Join the global community!
     We have a growing community of users who are discussing their experience with /e/OS. Join now, you will be able to help others answer common or uncommon questions they have about /e/:

    Join discussions, spread the word!

    It’s important to share your experience on our forums, tell us about what you like, your frustrations… It helps us to identify improvements for the product and make it a Premium mobile ecosystem.

    Also, please share the word! Every day, new users discover /e/ and love the project. We need all forces to ensure that as many people as possible learn about the project. We can’t count on mainstream media for this!

    So share with friends and your community channels, talk about /e/ on social media, say why you like it!

    You can also share what we post on Mastodon and Twitter.

    Contribute financially!
     
    With your help, we can support a growing team of passionate contributors, keep /e/ completely independent and make /e/OS sustainable over time.

    Every donation helps the project to pursue additional developments, rent servers for compilation, rent servers to host your e.email account or the community forum, pay for domain names and other key expenses amongst other things.

    If you can afford a recurring donation, become an /e/ Patron!

    Otherwise, choose from the different donations options, and get a reward in return!

     
     

    by admin at September 10, 2020 10:40

    September 07, 2020

    Purism

    Librem 5 Emulators and Controllers

    While the Librem 5 does support many actively developed games, it also has an impressive list of emulators that can be used.

    Mame (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator), Mednafen, and RetroArch can all be easily installed from PureOS today. These emulators cover many of the basics from Apple II to SNES.

    Some emulators are not yet in our store, but you can still build them by hand. Snes9x, mupen64, and PPSSPP fall in this category, but they are well worth your time to build.

    Order now and join our growing effort to change the world.

    Discover the Librem 5

    Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

    Preorder now

    The post Librem 5 Emulators and Controllers appeared first on Purism.

    by David Hamner at September 07, 2020 17:42